10 tech things we didn't know a week ago

10 tech things we didn't know a week ago

Summary: Behind on the news and hungry for more? Here's what we learned this week — including who are the "enemies of the Internet," and can bulletproof glass protect an iPhone?

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  • 1. YouTube has an elite group of content killers

    YouTube has been on a comment-pruning mission in recent months to make the site a little more family friendly — if it'll ever get that far — by removing harmful comments and tying Google+ accounts to comment threads to remove the air of anonymity. Going one step further, YouTube is now enlisting "trusted flaggers" to help police the site, The Wall Street Journal reported this week. These some-200 individual super-flaggers will help remove content that fall foul of Google's guidelines, the report said.

    Image: Spencer E Holtaway/Flickr

  • 2. Algorithms can write breaking news

    Move over, assignment editor — you're not needed for this one — particularly in the case of the California earthquake this week, reported by the Los Angeles Times, which published just three minutes after the quake hit. How? Because an algorithm wrote it, according to Slate. But, anyone who was on the east coast during the quake will know that no matter how fast your journalists (or robots) are, they will never be faster than those Twitter users jolted awake in the early hours by an semi-regular seismic shift.

    Image: LA Times

  • 3. Microsoft gets as much as $200 from the FBI for user data requests

    Microsoft was reimbursed by more than a millions dollars over the course of 2013 for U.S. data requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), reports The Daily Dot, which leaked documents that were hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army earlier this year. A single request for data costs the U.S. taxpayer as much as $200, but the figure varies, the documents show. It's not unique to Microsoft, either. Many other tech companies, including Yahoo and Google, are paid a certain amount for (legal) access to its systems, based on earlier leaks.

    Image: White House

Topics: Tech Industry, Networking

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  • how is the windows app stire littered with malware?

    knocks.. maybe, but you find those on every platforms app store. including apple.


    the windows app store as far as I know has been very clean. At worse it is in par with apples app store for security.

    I can't say the same for google though.
    Emacho
  • YouTube

    Google lost a court case against the German equivalent of the MIAA, GEMA, last week.

    Google had been banning videos and claiming it was at the behest of GEMA. As GEMA hadn't asked for the videos to be removed, they were upset and sued Google. As a result, Google can no longer say that the videos have been removed at the behest of GEMA, but that Google has removed on its volition, because they have not spoken to GEMA to about licensing terms for the video.
    wright_is
  • Encryption keys...

    I'm pretty sure I've read about people in the U.S. who are languishing in jail because they refused to comply with a judge's order to decrypt their own computer Hard Drives. These cases tend to involve people suspected of child porn violations. So I'm not 100% convinced that the 5th amendment allows you to withhold an encryption key from prosecutors.
    dsf3g
  • I Like This Column

    Zack:

    I didn't know many of these items. A cool little digest. Keep it up!

    Thanks
    randycpu
  • didn't we

    we didn’t know this a week ago?!? some maybe.
    freemangeoff