10 tech things we didn't know a week ago

10 tech things we didn't know a week ago

Summary: Behind on the news and hungry for more? Here's what we learned this week — including which city is doing more for tech than Silicon Valley, and Samsung's biggest ally.

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  • 1. Almost 90 percent of electronic spying is carried out by governments

    Verizon's latest data breach report released this week blew open how vulnerable payment systems are to attacks, and how distributed denial-of-service attacks are taking on the retail sector. But buried in the report, one data nugget showed that governments make up almost all of the electronic eavesdropping and spying in the world today. The irony of course is that Verizon continues to stay mum on any word relating to the Snowden leaks, which through the phone giant under the bus in the first round of disclosures back in June 2013.

    Image: Defense. Dept./National Security Agency

  • 2. Google agreed to pay Samsung to defend it against Apple

    As the Apple v. Samsung courtroom drama continues, we learned this week that the Korean smartphone giant had a (not too surprising) ally in the thermonuclear war against Android: no other than Google itself, the maker of the open-source platform. According to testimony, Samsung and Google signed a deal that would include Google apps on Samsung's Galaxy smartphone range. So, the search turned mobile giant would help with likely legal costs related to the technology. 

    Image: CBS Interactive

  • 3. Silicon Valley tech titans face bans from Russia under new law

    Russia may soon be able to ban Silicon Valley giants, including domestic Russian startups and businesses, if they do not store Russian customer details and data inside the country. This is reportedly so the country's security and intelligence services can snoop on its citizens' data. Unlike the U.S. and other countries, Russia doesn't have the legal power to force foreign companies to hand over data. The government may force Internet providers in the country to block sites and services that fail to comply.

    Image: Mark Zuckerberg/Facebook

Topics: Security, Networking, Storage

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