10 ways cloud computing will change in 2013

10 ways cloud computing will change in 2013

Summary: As enterprise steps up its use of cloud services analyst house Forrester has predicted how business use of cloud platforms and services will change next year.

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Enterprise use of cloud services continues to grow - albeit from a small base - and in 2013 analyst house Forrester says many companies will begin deployment of private clouds.

As spending on cloud services and platforms picks up, the way businesses use such services will also evolve. Forrester has put together 10 ways its analysts expect attitudes surrounding cloud to change next year.

Business will get real about cloud costs

Organisations will start paying more attention to cloud costs in 2013, Forrester claims.

Cloud isn't always cheaper, it's just likely to be cheaper if organisations follow the right use model. To get the best ROI out of cloud services and platforms organisations need to model the cost profile of applications, monitor the resources they use and adjust any deployment to balance cost against performance, according to the analysts.

Cloud cost-monitoring tools like Cloudyn, CloudCruiser, Cloudability, Newvem and Rightscale, plus the cost-reporting tools from large cloud vendors, provide a way of doing these calculations.

Good cost management should also drive business' hybrid deployment, service selection, and discount schedule negotiations, Forrester says.

CFOs are likely to wake up to this opportunity to reduce the cost of cloud services in 2013, it predicts.

Attitudes to cloud service level agreements change

Organisations will realise that it is better to build the resiliency they need into the cloud-based apps, rather than the platforms they run on.

Taking this approach will allow organisations to stand more chance of getting the performance, availability and security they need, Forrester said.

The other advantage is not incurring the cost of negotiating a high SLA from a cloud vendor when only one in 10 of the apps deployed on a platform require that level of guarantees.

Development of enterprise apps on public cloud will be sanctioned

Infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams will accept that in-house developers will be using public cloud platforms to build apps.

Sanctioning development, rather than attempting to block it, will allow I&O teams to provide guidance on how to use these platforms securely and put in place appropriate oversight.

Cloud takes off for back-up and disaster recovery

Data that previously was cheaper to back up to traditional DR storage will be cheaper and easier to back up through a cloud-based disaster recovery system - where virtual machine data is replicated to a multi-tenanted cloud platform - as well as faster to recover, it predicts.

Part of the reason for the possible cost reduction is that a cloud-based disaster recovery system will be pay-per-use, eliminating the need for a capital investment to build a secondary DR site.

Cloud doesn't have to mean commodity

Cloud services might be renowned for running on low-cost, commodity hardware but 2013 will see a proliferation of services backed by high-end components, Forrester predicts.

As demand rises for market-specific cloud services and cloud vendors attempt to differentiate themselves it predicts a rise in services backed by non-commodity hardware.

The analyst house says the trend is already evident, in services backed by high-end GPUs and SSDs.

Amazon Web Services will have a fight on its hands

In 2013 Amazon Web Services will face stiffening competition for the cloud platform market that it currently dominates, with as much as 70 percent market share, according to Forrester.

It predicts challenges from Microsoft and Google, thanks to what it calls "significant improvements to their platforms". By the end of 2013 Forrester also expects there to be "at least three substantial OpenStack-based clouds building strong positions".

Businesses will accept that not everything belongs in the cloud

2013 will be the year that the idea that everything is going to go to the cloud will go away, Forrester predicts.

IT buyers will increasingly understand the strengths and weaknesses of cloud platforms and how they differ from traditional virtual infrastructures and hosting environments. Companies should recruit in-house developers with hands-on experience of these different platforms to help decide what workloads belong in which environment, it says.

Cloud and mobile will become one

During 2013 there will be greater convergence between mobile applications and cloud-based services.

Forrester predicts a growth in the already popular practice of connecting mobile applications to cloud-based back-end services that can elastically respond to demand from mobile clients. It says the practice also has the advantage of lessening the load and security risks of having this traffic connect to a business's datacentres.

Forrester analyst Glenn O'Donnell says "cloud plus mobile is a classic more than the sum of its parts combination".

Businesses will acknowledge that virtualisation does not mean cloud

Enterprise I&O departments will need to stop misselling virtualised environments as private cloud in 2013, Forrester says.

These virtualised environments are typically not private clouds, it says, as very few offer self-service to developers, fully-automated provisioning, standardised services or cost transparency. Instead they are mostly static virtual environments that drive workload consolidation, operational efficiencies and fast recovery.

In 2013 I&O teams should acknowledge that both have a place in the datacentre, according to the analyst house, and stop trying to sell one as the other.

Developers will realise development isn't that different in the cloud

According to Forrester's cloud developer survey the majority of languages, frameworks, and development methodologies used in the enterprise are also in use in the cloud.

There are few excuses for a well-trained developer to not be productive in the cloud, the analyst house says.

Topics: Cloud, Enterprise Software, Software

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

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16 comments
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  • www.Google.MEL7.CoM

    Love my job, since I've been bringing in $74h… I sit at home, music playing while I work in front of my new iMac that I got now that I'm making it online..Above
    stefaniecarter29
  • One thing you missed

    I waiting for the story about some enterprising hacker compromising the cloud and stealing sensitive data compromising thousands of accounts.

    It seems to me the cloud Evangelist are taking the same ignorance is bliss approach to security when they were preaching the super informational highway.
    Richardbz
    • Not just Security in General

      I agree with you. The "Cloud" has set back data security at least 10 years! At work, my concern is "Compliance". We have had one Cloud project cancelled because 2 days before signing, they found out that Google Docs/Apps were NOT CJIS (Criminal Information Systems regulation) compatible. It's funny that public cloud providers advertise some law enforcement officer as representing criminal justice storage but Google claims that they are NOT CJIS compliant. Then there all the medical offices keeping patient data on the public cloud even though they are not HIPAA compatible. I'm just waiting for the shoe to drop on all of the people keeping HIPAA data out there.

      Imagine that your favorite restaurant keeps your credit card information on the public cloud?? Would you want Google employees in some foreign country having access to your credit card numbers?

      If people would quit looking at the benefits so much and start reading the terms of service, FAQs and privacy policy of all of the public clouds, maybe people will change their attitude. Some stiff fines would do the trick, too.
      hforman@...
      • Next Stop: Trough of Disillusionment.

        I can say that as a Cloud Security Alliance partner and training provider, the "Trough of Disillusionment" is coming in 2013. So many companies really believe that cloud providers are soley responsible for the security of their systems that it simply can't be avoided.

        Accountability for maintaining compliance always has been, and always will be on the company held responsible for safeguarding of assets. Many are either willfully ignorant of this fact or simply incapable of doing their jobs properly. There are so many cases I can recount of companies that simply provide a credit card and start their cloud implementations with no idea of who to call in the event of a incident. WHEN (not if) something goes wrong, it will be a shocking eye-opener for the vast majority of public cloud consumers.

        There is Cloud Security Alliance guidance out there as well as training available - like 1 day to make sure you have your bases covered. Check out www.intrinsecsecurity.com/cloud-security-alliance-training.html for where to begin with security of your cloud-based services.
        Intrinsec
  • Point no 3 - Cloud services are great for Disaster Recovery solutions

    Great article and couldn't get more agreeable. I would love to discuss pointe no. 3 for 'Cloud takes off for back-up and disaster recovery'. Recently, everyone knows about Sandy hurricane tragic disaster and data loss. It is an unfortunate lesson to have to learn the hard way, especially this hard way. But, natural disasters like hurricanes, floods or superstorms are dramatic examples of the value of cloud solutions when it comes to resiliency in the face of a catastrophe, and the ability to recover and resume operations as quickly as possible. Read this article to understand more: http://www.dincloud.com/blog/cloud-backup-disaster-recovery-vs-hurricane-superstorm-and-more
    dccameron111
  • Build Cloud Apps Quickly

    Develop web and mobile apps for your clients fast with WorkXpress.
    http://www.workxpress.com/
    Ss2112
  • Public vs Private Cloud

    This article speaks to the public cloud, not private cloud. Eventually everything will move to the cloud but not everything will move to the public cloud. Companies will change their infrastructure in line with cloud guidelines. This will provide companies a secure local environment with all the redundancy and agility options that the public cloud allows. CIO's and CFO's will be able to then determine where is the best place to store their data, depending on the type of data and the access model they want to build around it.

    One point I disagree on, "Mobile and Cloud will become one", they can't, it's two widely different technologies. The headline should be, "Mobile will drive Cloud adoption", which is what will happen.
    nicopretorius
  • Public vs Private Cloud

    This article speaks to the public cloud, not private cloud. Eventually everything will move to the cloud but not everything will move to the public cloud. Companies will change their infrastructure in line with cloud guidelines. This will provide companies a secure local environment with all the redundancy and agility options that the public cloud allows. CIO's and CFO's will be able to then determine where is the best place to store their data, depending on the type of data and the access model they want to build around it.

    One point I disagree on, "Mobile and Cloud will become one", they can't, it's two widely different technologies. The headline should be, "Mobile will drive Cloud adoption", which is what will happen.
    nicopretorius
    • Microsoft launches Azure private cloud in a box

      http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsoft-launches-azure-private-cloud-in-a-box/6778
      Nole Mercy
  • Public vs Private Cloud

    This article speaks to the public cloud, not private cloud. Eventually everything will move to the cloud but not everything will move to the public cloud. Companies will change their infrastructure in line with cloud guidelines. This will provide companies a secure local environment with all the redundancy and agility options that the public cloud allows. CIO's and CFO's will be able to then determine where is the best place to store their data, depending on the type of data and the access model they want to build around it.

    One point I disagree on, "Mobile and Cloud will become one", they can't, it's two widely different technologies. The headline should be, "Mobile will drive Cloud adoption", which is what will happen.
    nicopretorius
    • Yes, Google is leading the way in Mobile Cloud Deployment

      I agree that Mobile will drive Cloud Adoption. Here are examples from Google that have driven much of the Cloud adoption to this point from personal prespectives. I expect these to be adopted to a large part in Businesses as these are familiar apps that can and will make business work faster and smarter in many cases.

      1. Google Docs has eliminated the need for MS Office
      a. All Docs MS Office supports are available via web enterface on the web.
      b. This is also a network drive. PC and Tab and Phone
      c. Save from Gmail to GDocs and the size limit is now gone.
      2. Google Picasa for pictures or graphics and also identifying people in pictures for easy search of individuals.
      3. Gmail everywhere.
      4. Google Maps.
      5. Google Search.
      6. Google+
      7. Google Earth.
      8. Google Play Store and Backup and Restore
      a. Find your apps
      b. Update your apps
      c. Backup and Restore your apps
      d. Downside you have to use cloud to backup your data. Or use Google Mail, Address book and Calendar to allow easy restore.

      There is more to this but that is the beginning of what will drive this.
      carydc1
  • Bottom Line Up Front

    1. Where is your data stored? The Cloud
    2. Who owns the Cloud? The Cloud Provider
    3. Who owns your data? The Cloud Provider
    4. Who then is holding your future in their hands? The Cloud Provider
    5. Who is liable when the cloud is down for any reason? You are and the Cloud Provider after a fashion. Initially you are always held responsible.

    Who exactly are these cloud providers? This is not a matter of trust. This is a matter of Security. Hackers yes that is an issue, a major issue. Who is to say your competition has not negotiated a back door deal to get full access to a copy of your data? Would you even know it has happened? Data is Data, It is also Power, it is the power that your company runs on.

    Think LONG and VERY HARD on this before considering moving to the External Cloud for ANYTHING.
    carydc1
    • Encrypt

      If you're using Cloud Storage, you really should encrypt. That won't help you much with GMail or iCloud but for Dropbox and Google Drive you should.
      jpolk84
  • Hmm

    It seems to me the Cloud as a complete ecosystem is counterproductive. I'm rather surprised at how many people surrender themselves to it. I guess it shouldn't be too surprising given that we're relinquishing so much of our control in other areas these days. But Cloud has one huge setback: connectivity is not ubiquitous. Pundits like to talk a lot about it but the truth is unless you live in a fair-sized city, the Cloud is largely of no use. Obviously for those who have zero connectivity it's of no use but even if connectivity is spotty it's useless. The answer would seem to be to not go there but you often don't have that choice. If you travel, you dissect these areas and for the time you're in them, you're toast. And there are swaths of places you'd never think would have coverage issues that do. Now add to all of this the fact that you might find yourself in an area where everyone has coverage but you. The Cloud isn't overcast. It's partly cloudy and that's an issue. Even with all the connectivity in the world, I still wonder why people are ready to throw their data on the Cloud at will. Remember, if that Cloud ever gets taken down you have nothing.
    jpolk84
  • Where can I find list of cloud solutions and service providers?

    Finding the info above is not an easy task, this is why we developed ITQlick.com. it's a professional network for IT vendors and consumers with updated directory of IT/IS solutions and services for businesses. IT/IS Vendors and consultants can list their products and services. it's FREE.
    Shlomi Lavie
  • When will iCloud stop using Azure...

    When will iCloud stop using Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services for their cloud? Did Apple give up on creating their own servers? They are already have a UNIX based OS so I'm surprised they still rely on Microsoft and Amazon for their cloud services.
    Nole Mercy