100k Melbournians get myki card

100k Melbournians get myki card

Summary: Over 100,000 Melbourne commuters have signed up for a myki card since the system began operation for trains on 29 December.

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Over 100,000 Melbourne commuters have signed up for a myki card since the system began operation for trains on 29 December.

myki reader

Myki reader
(Credit: Transport Ticketing Authority)

Around 114,000 had taken advantage of the free card offer by applying online, which is running until 17 January, a myki spokesperson told ZDNet.com.au. Normally the card costs $10 for full-paying commuters and $7 for concession holders, with the cards intended to be usable for four years, according to the spokesperson.

According to Victoria's Transport Ticketing Authority (TTA), Melbourne commuters make around 350,000 travel sessions per day.

Myki operator, Kamco, will receive bonus payments if 980,000 cards are taken up within six months, according to the Herald Sun.

Some of Kamco's payment is performance-related, according to the spokesperson for the TTA; however, Kamco has received no bonus payments as yet.

The system has been the target of a lot of criticism since its roll-out on Melbourne trains at the year's end. The intention had been to have a city-wide roll-out across buses and trams as well, but as the "end of the year" deadline approached, the decision was made to implement the system purely for trains.

Since the roll-out, myki has been criticised for having a website that has been on the blink, sending cards with incorrect details to people who had applied for them, and not equipping transport officials with card scanners.

The Opposition Leader Tim Baillieu even called for Transport Minister Lynne Kosky to return from leave to take responsibility for the roll-out.

However, the spokesperson for the TTA said that the cards, which were sent to customers, were the right ones, they were only accompanied by incorrect letters. Card distribution had been halted yesterday so that the company which had developed the myki system, Kamco, could investigate the problem.

Distribution was expected to resume this afternoon.

Topics: Government, Government AU

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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Talkback

5 comments
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  • not an endorsement

    i like the government spin that all these applications for the card are an endorsement of the system. Only because its free, thats the only reason - its something you have to have even if you dont want it and it will cost later.
    anonymous
  • Wrong letters == privacy breach ???

    "However, the spokesperson for the TTA said that the cards, which were sent to customers, were the right ones, they were only accompanied by incorrect letters. "

    If the above statement is correct and the wrong letters contained personal name and addresses of person other than the recepient, this would have consituted a worst mistake in privacy breach.
    anonymous
  • Anonymous myki cards require personal details

    I tried to sign up for an anonymous myki card, but it's not possible without providing personal details
    anonymous
  • And it presumes we have a choice!

    I liked the auto-reply email I got thanking me for choosing myki ... I didn't realise I had a choice! (Other than choosing to drive in which is probably what I'll do!)
    anonymous
  • The whole MyKi debacle was totally mishandled by completely incompetent and irresponsible people who have no idea how to managed these projects. And this goes all the way up to the highest echelons of government. First of all when you buy off-the-shelf systems you have to fit the environment to the system, else you will spend a lifetime trying to redevelop the system. If I give you a hammer and say redevelop it into MyKi, well a nightmare is what you get. Secondly, when you outsource this to a company whose main goal is to milk a fat cow, you will have a project riddled with change requests (this is where companies make the money) and huge costs overruns (spoken from experience). This project could have been done by a crack team of experienced developers for way under $100 million - if done from ground up. Compared to a typical enterprise system running a big corporation, this is a relatively simple project with relatively fewer use cases. I think an investigation should be conducted with root-cause analysis to make sure the responsible partiies are held accountable for the mess.
    fanfareforthecommonman