5 open source myths debunked

5 open source myths debunked

Summary: The open-source industry will soon reach another milestone when Linux celebrates its 20th anniversary on 25 August. Advocates identify five misconceptions surrounding the technology and discuss how these have since been proven false with the emergence of a viable business model.

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TOPICS: Open Source, Linux
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The open-source industry will soon reach another milestone when Linux celebrates its 20th anniversary on 25 August. Advocates identify five misconceptions surrounding the technology and discuss how these have since been proven false with the emergence of a viable business model.

Traditionally, open-source software (OSS) such as Linux was created and refined by a community of software enthusiasts working on it as a hobby or fuelled by their personal passion. Linux founder Linus Torvalds, for example, was a computer science student at the University of Helsinki when he created the operating system (OS).

This has resulted in several commonly-held perceptions regarding OSS, such as a lack of capability and support for deployment in the enterprise space, and an insufficient security foundation.

ZDNet Asia spoke to three open-source industry players for their views on these perceptions.

  • Myth 1: open source is not ready for the "big time"
    According to Dirk-Peter van Leeuwen, vice president and general manager at Red Hat Asia-Pacific, the origins of open source resulted in the technology being associated with software that was "cobbled together by amateurs and hobbyists". In turn, this allowed the myth that open source was unsuitable for use in corporate settings to perpetuate.

    However, van Leeuwen said "some of the biggest names in key industries" have taken to using open-source platforms such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to implement high-volume, mission-critical applications. He pointed to an example of this, which can be seen in several stock exchanges: over 50 per cent of the world's trading volume is run on the RHEL platform.

    Furthermore, he cited a Gartner study which predicted that 99 per cent of Global 2000 enterprises would include OSS in their mission-critical software portfolios by 2016, up from 75 per cent in 2010.

    "These points effectively debunk the myth that open-source software isn't ready for the big time and, in fact, validate its track record in handling demanding, mission-critical deployments," van Leeuwen said.

  • Myth 2: big companies don't use open source software
    In a related point, Lila Tretikov, CIO and vice president of engineering at open-source customer relationship management (CRM) vendor, SugarCRM, said that more enterprises were opening up their IT environments to open-source deployments.

    She cited Virgin Airlines as a global company that had showed support for open source, saying at this year's Open Source Business Conference that the majority of the airline's IT systems were open source and that the airline clocked 100 per cent uptime for all of these systems.

    Tretikov pointed to Google, Amazon and Facebook as other notable companies that leverage open source for their IT needs.

  • Myth 3: open source is not secure enough
    Security also has been an open-source bugbear, according to both van Leeuwen and Tretikov.

    Van Leeuwen explained that because of the stereotype that open source was developed by amateurs, it was assumed that such software would contain multiple bugs due to the lack of quality assurance.

    Additionally, it was thought that these amateur developers were either not sophisticated enough in their skills or saw no reasons to build enterprise-grade security into the software they were developing, he noted.

    Tretikov said that the notion of paid software being more secure than open source equivalents had been "largely debunked" over the last 10 years, due to a series of "controversies" that spotlighted vulnerabilities inherent in paid software.

    "Many of the Microsoft Server OS's vulnerabilities came out during the emergence of the cloud infrastructure," she pointed out. Comparatively, Linux systems withstood the impact of exposure to the open internet, she noted, which was why cloud computing vendors today base their technical stacks primarily on open-source technologies.

    She added that the higher security threshold in OSS was driven by the software's exposure to an "exponentially higher level of scrutiny" from software developers, security experts and hackers within the open source community.

    OrangeHRM CEO and co-founder, Sujee Saparamadu, said that Fortune 500 companies currently run open-source software such as Linux for their mission-critical applications because these are "more stable than proprietary software".

  • Myth 4: open source is all about infrastructure
    Tretikov noted that because open-source technologies first emerged at the systems level, and subsequently went on to be used heavily to support cloud infrastructure services and platforms, people tended to think open-source applications were only used at this level of the computing stack.

    That was not accurate, though, she said as "hundreds" of open-source companies in the last decade had successfully brought to market enterprise OSS such as CRM, enterprise resource planning (ERP) and marketing automation applications.

    Earlier, experts agreed that open-source projects have been mushrooming across the computing stack. Charles Zedlewski, vice president for product at Cloudera, also noted that OSS tended to be "most successful in broad, horizontal software categories".

  • Myth 5: it is difficult to find applications running on open-source platforms
    As an extension to the point mentioned above, van Leeuwen highlighted that companies used to think there were few independent software vendors (ISVs) or big IT shops willing to develop applications for open source platforms as these would not be utilised.

    Judging by the number of developer partners Red Hat alone has been able to sign up, currently over 2500 ISV partners, van Leeuwen said this viewpoint obviously could not be substantiated.

    Companies, too, are now working with open-source developers to come up with products that would boost their businesses, he noted. Singapore's taxi operator ComforDelGro, for example, developed its SMS taxi booking system on the company's JBoss Seam application server to help reduce customer waiting time and improve overall user experience, van Leeuwen said.

    Via ZDNet Asia

Topics: Open Source, Linux

Kevin Kwang

About Kevin Kwang

A Singapore-based freelance IT writer, Kevin made the move from custom publishing focusing on travel and lifestyle to the ever-changing, jargon-filled world of IT and biz tech reporting, and considered this somewhat a leap of faith. Since then, he has covered a myriad of beats including security, mobile communications, and cloud computing.

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2 comments
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  • After all these years we are still debunking myths are we ? I think the open source community doesn't really listen to the world around them.

    If you notice these days, people don't really talk about software prices anymore. Why because we are so often bombarded with prices and of course free software. Then there is free apps like Facebook, Twitter etc so people are less inclined to think about source code like they did during the "hippie" 80 and 90's.

    Consumers and businesses alike just use what works. At my company we use a number of open source software and other paid software. What we care about is that it just works. Our websites work on Drupal. Heldesk system is RT. But office apps are Microsoft and we build our systems on Microsoft technologies.

    So OSS people, there is no bogeyman around the corner. No one is out to get you. If you're happy to churn out software, we are happy to use it. And no most of us don't really care about the source code as much as we care about good quality software. If you don't believe me ask Thoughtworks.

    Also with all the "cloud apps" coming out, there is even less reason to poke around in code. Consumers are getting everything as a service and are happy to pay for them.

    Maybe its time for the penguin to evolve.

    -- Ubuntu Server/RT/Drupal user.
    Azizi Khan
  • Most of these myths are "Aunt Sallys" - set up by Mr Kwang so he can knock them down. The only real objections to Open Source have been the lack of a Big Name behind it, and fears about support. The advantage of not being locked in to a single vendor does seem to be slowly sinking in, and I doubt if there are many problems in support these days.
    Zelator-77c76