ACMA targets PC virus telemarketers

ACMA targets PC virus telemarketers

Summary: The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has announced that it is ramping up its fight against telemarketers who try to convince customers that their computers are infected by viruses and then charge a fee for removal.

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has announced that it is ramping up its fight against telemarketers who try to convince customers that their computers are infected by viruses and then charge a fee for removal.

"The ACMA understands that while some businesses offer a legitimate virus prevention or removal service, many are falsely claiming to be related to reputable companies, such as Microsoft," said ACMA's chairman, Chris Chapman.

"In the first three months of 2011, nearly half of all complaints about telemarketing calls made to numbers on the Do Not Call Register have been about these types of calls."

The ACMA is embarking on a targeted compliance campaign aimed at these businesses. Companies that are investigated by the ACMA run the risk of incurring a penalty of up to $110,000 per day.

The ACMA will also be working with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, cooperating with international regulators and voice over internet protocol providers to identify rogue telemarketers.

The Do Not Call Register is a free federal government service where Australians can register their numbers to opt out of telemarketing calls.

Topics: Government, Government AU, Malware, Microsoft, Security

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3 comments
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  • It's about time ACMA stepped up to the plate on these mongrel's... I have heard of at least one person who was scammed big time with this, I am still scratching my head about how gullible they were to give their credit card number to some unknown over the phone just because they said they were from Microsoft!

    I had the scammers ring me & I partly put my hand over the phone & said to my wife "quick give me the mobile so I can call the police" guess what the scammers hung up! LOL
    COKEBOTTLE-64c88
  • I'm sick of these interfering with legitimate site access. If I want to visit "randomname.com" and keep getting these fake virus warnings, how many other potential customers are lost to "randomname.com"?

    I someone rang me on the phone to tell me I had a virus infection, hanging up is one of the first actions I would consider.
    Treknology
  • We kept on getting these sorts of calls at home at one point. Fortunately, mum is computer illiterate, and so would not go through with what these people were saying. It was about a week later that I had a day off, and received this call.

    Within the first thirty seconds, I was a complete **** to them. When they started with "We have tracked virus messages being sent from your computer", I retaliated with "So what's my IP address, and who is my service provider?" Here they stumbled, by trying to avoid the question. So I tricked them, by giving them the IP address to the microsoft.com domain. When they said that was what their record shows, I caught them out and threatened them with police. We never got a call after that.
    dmh_paul