ADF to run social media review

ADF to run social media review

Summary: The Australian Defence Force has finally flagged a review of its social media use policy, triggered by the recent sex scandal within the Australian Defence Force Academy.

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The Australian Defence Force (ADF) has finally flagged a review of its social media use policy, triggered by the recent sex scandal within the Australian Defence Force Academy.

The review is set to make recommendations around the use of social media in line with Defence Force values.

"The review will examine Defence's obligations in relation to the use of social media by its employees and the organisation, and make recommendations to mitigate associated risks and to harness opportunities to improve Defence's work and reputation," the Defence Force said in a statement today.

"The impact of social media has created new challenges for the ADF and the Defence organisation," it admitted.

Social media and carriage services have caused multiple headaches for the ADF in the last six months, with high profile arrests made after two cadets were alleged to have filmed and broadcast a sex act to other cadets via Skype at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

Facebook has also caused headaches for the ADF, with the most recent arrest being made yesterday. An ex-ADF member was charged by police for allegedly making a Facebook gay-hate site and threatening a senior officer via email.

Another cadet is also being investigated after posting racist slurs on his Facebook page against the Afghani people.

The review is set to be run by Rob Hudson from consulting firm George Patterson Y&R with an interim report due at the end of July.

Topics: Security, Social Enterprise

Luke Hopewell

About Luke Hopewell

A fresh recruit onto the tech journalism battlefield, Luke Hopewell is eager to see some action. After a tour of duty in the belly of the Telstra beast, he is keen to report big stories on the enterprise beat. Drawing on past experience in radio, print and magazine, he plans to ask all the tough questions you want answered.

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  • It's appropriate to do a review to see what went wrong and what lessons can be learnt. However, it's the media and reach that has changed NOT the underlying considerations of security, probity, and hopefully common sense.

    Service personell have to recognise that no matter what their personal rights etc, they are a defence employee and have to consider the public implications of their actions.

    Similarly, employees have to consider the implications of their actions and how the public will associate that with their employer (or what their employer thinks).
    Scott W-ef9ad