Alleged Wolverine pirate arrested

Alleged Wolverine pirate arrested

Summary: NSW police have arrested a 38-year-old woman for allegedly burning and selling pirated DVDs, including new film X-Men Origins: Wolverine, according to a music industry group.

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NSW police have arrested a 38-year-old woman for allegedly burning and selling pirated DVDs, including new film X-Men Origins: Wolverine, according to a music industry group.

X-Men Origins
(Credit: 20th Century Fox)

Australian industry body Music Industry Piracy Investigations (MIPI) said that the police stopped the woman outside a pub in Wetherill Park on Friday after receiving information that she was selling pirated films and music in pubs in Sydney's western suburbs. More than 600 suspected pirated films and albums were found in a nearby car.

The woman's arrest and the discovery of the discs led police to what was allegedly a disc burner lab in Sydney's Westmead. The lab allegedly had the potential to produce 378,000 pirated discs a year, worth $1.8 million on the street.

The Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft (AFACT) also helped with the investigation, which MIPI said involved weeks of covert surveillance and investigation.

AFACT's director of operations Neil Gane thanked the member of the public who had called attention to the racket and claimed Australian businesses suffered greatly from piracy.

"That pirated copies of X-Men Origins: Wolverine were discovered amongst the haul is especially disappointing. The film was made in Australia, employed over 1000 Australians, engaged over 100 Australian companies and contributed over $80 million to the local economy. The flagrant sales of pirated copies of the film is a slap in the face to the hard work and creativity that so many Australians put into the movie," he alleged in a statement. The film has not yet been shown in cinemas worldwide.

AFACT is also currently in a court stoush with iiNet. It claims that iiNet allowed its users to use its internet service to illegally download and upload pirated films.

Topics: Piracy, Government, Government AU, Security, Telcos

Suzanne Tindal

About Suzanne Tindal

Suzanne Tindal cut her teeth at ZDNet.com.au as the site's telecommunications reporter, a role that saw her break some of the biggest stories associated with the National Broadband Network process. She then turned her attention to all matters in government and corporate ICT circles. Now she's taking on the whole gamut as news editor for the site.

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Talkback

13 comments
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  • That's a lot of discs

    378,000 a year equates to about 43 DVDs an hour! Impressive.
    anonymous
  • AFACT

    So, once you finish with the iinet case will you go after the makers of DVD burners as they should know that people are going to use DVD burners to burn DVD's and sell them just as apparently so should iinet. Then, how about you go after the people who supplied the blank DVDs that were used to burn the movies.

    .....OR, how about the real no brainer, the MOVIE INDUSTRY not having spare copies of a movie you just made laying around to be picked up and pirated?

    WHO IS TO BLAME REALLY?

    What a waste of money AFACT, catch the people doing the stealing and distributing and fine them, they are the perputrators.
    anonymous
  • So this is where our tax dollars are going?

    How many millions of our tax dollars are going to preventing the 'theft' of copyright material? One would think that our money would be better spent elsewhere on say... the national infrastructure. Major work is required on our roads, hospitals, trains, water and electrical systems but here we are shelling millions on this nonsense.

    The movie studios will never change their ways as long as we're footing the bill.

    Let the movies studios do their own dirty work and lets get our police back to chasing after real criminals.
    anonymous
  • Disc burner lab

    What is a disc burner lab?
    Is it full of mad scientists devising disk burners
    anonymous
  • Disc Lab

    maybe "lab" is used so as to try and make us link the activity to drugs... as in meth lab etc - makes the crime sound much worse, eh?... I think they really just mean "a room"... but that sounds dull; "discs led police to a room in Sydney's Westmead"...
    anonymous
  • Yawn

    "So, once you finish with the iinet case will you go after the makers of DVD burners as they should know that people are going to use DVD burners to burn DVD's and sell them just as apparently so should iinet. Then, how about you go after the people who supplied the blank DVDs that were used to burn the movies."

    Hang on, you're comparing a company which provided an internet service which some of it's users downloaded copyright material over, to a person who intentionally downloaded the same (or similar) files with the intent of selling them for profit?

    ".....OR, how about the real no brainer, the MOVIE INDUSTRY not having spare copies of a movie you just made laying around to be picked up and pirated?"

    Typically any pirate release at the cinema or not yet out that is of good quality is done from a media release copy. This may come as a shock by that's how people can review the films prior to them being released.

    "WHO IS TO BLAME REALLY?
    What a waste of money AFACT, catch the people doing the stealing and distributing and fine them, they are the perputrators."

    Had this women been downloading them to watch them at home then the authorities probably won't have even known about her and if they had may have even turned a blind eye, but she's going one step further and selling them for self profit. For lack of a better description she is selling stolen property.
    anonymous
  • Wake up

    Terry, it seems you didn't read the previous post properly. Susannah compared IINET with the makers of DVD burners and makers of blank DVDs, not the ones who use them for whatever purposes. The article made a link IINET case which is a completely different matter, which is what Susannah is complaining about.
    anonymous
  • bullsh*t

    I agree with previous posts. We don't see the movie industry going after the manufacturers of DVDs and DVD burners, do we? They are playing an equal part in this as are broadband providers in "aiding" piracy. Unfortunately the Australian govt has its head so far up its arse (when it comes to technology) that they support things like the iinet piracy case and content filtering etc. The complete antithesis of what the internet is supposed to be.

    And the whole sob story about how this case damages Australian industry... You can't be serious! Did the 1000 Australians involved in making this film not get paid, or have to pay back their salaries because of this? Are the movie studios not going to make films in Australia anymore because some punter was caught bootlegging movies in a pub in Sydney!!! Get real.
    anonymous
  • Copyright is wrong!

    Copyright Laws where first introduced to protect the rights of the artist and allow the artist to profit of their creative works for a period then the material is supposed to become public domain.

    Originally copyright was limited to only 14 years, now some copyrights last 100 years, the artist is dead by then how is it protecting the artist right to profit.

    Copyright laws have been bastardized and exploited by large companies into what they are today.

    Information should be free for all people not horded and coveted by the few, that is how the original laws were written. It is a shame and a disgrace to the human race what they have now become.

    Copyright and Patent laws are really holding the human race back as a whole they are preventing innovation and new ideas by hording and preventing people from expanding their ideas through fear of prosecution, royalties and the control of information!
    anonymous
  • has noone picked up on this line?

    "AFACT) also helped with the investigation, which MIPI said involved weeks of covert surveillance and investigation."

    Now last time i checked AFACT wasnt actually a government agency, now what the hell are they doing 'covertly survalling' some person they think may be pirating material, what do they mean by survalling, as in hidden mikes? landline taps... pizza vans with suspiciously large satellite dishes on the roof?

    and if AFACT is allowed to do this, then am i, as a small business owner, afforded the same rights as this large business and can go around recording and watching who ever the hell i like to see if it impacts my business??

    I'm all for catching commercial pirates, but seriously, what ever happened to walking up the street vendor, 'hi i'd like to buy 1', aha! you are pirating, your under arrest
    anonymous
  • BURN HOLYWOOD BURN !

    the makers of the movie have already been paid - the only ones losing out here are the mega rich movie studio owners and any actors getting a cut of ticket sales .. oh and cinemas but they need to drop their prices BIG TIME or add value to them . .
    anonymous
  • whinging over nothing

    This is exactly what AFACT should be doing, stopping people who PROFIT from downloading/stealing movies. If they concentrated more on this and stop trying to chase people who download movies for themselves through court cases with iiNet, they would be achieveing alot more.
    anonymous
  • Yes, but no

    You're right, it is holding back the free flow of new ideas, but by movie studios and record companies having big budgets, it means they can release better quality media. That's not going to be important to everyone, but it is good to bear in mind.

    The perfect system would be everyone has access to movie studios/record companies budgets and technology, and any profits go back into more of the same.
    anonymous