Amazon makes 15 more cities eligible for Sunday delivery

Amazon makes 15 more cities eligible for Sunday delivery

Summary: It may not be as big a move as expanding same-day delivery, but it's a significant step in the race to provide instant gratification to online shoppers.

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TOPICS: Amazon
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Amazon announced Thursday the addition of 15 U.S. cities to its list of eligible Sunday delivery locations. It may not be as big a move as expanding same-day delivery, but it's a significant step in the race to provide instant gratification to online shoppers.

The cities are clustered in the central part of the country, many within reasonable distance from one of the Internet giant's fleet of distribution centers. They include:

  • Austin, Texas
  • Cincinnati, Ohio
  • College Station, Texas
  • Columbus, Ohio
  • Dallas, Texas
  • Houston, Texas
  • Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Lexington, Kentucky
  • Louisville, Kentucky
  • New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • Shreveport, Louisiana
  • Waco, Texas 

Amazon's Mike Roth, VP of North America operations, said most of the items selected for Sunday delivery are part of a weekend errand to-do list:

So far, the most common items delivered on Sunday include baby supplies such as newborn apparel, books and toys. We know ourAmazon customers love the convenience of everyday delivery, and we're excited to be offering Sunday delivery in more cities across the U.S.

Amazon partners with the U.S. Postal Service for its Sunday delivery operations and said since launching Sunday delivery in New York and Los Angeles last November, millions of packages have been bestowed upon shop-happy consumers.

Last month Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has told investors the company is working on its seventh and eighth generation Prime drones, which the company hopes will be making deliveries by 2015. While the drones would make delivery conisderably faster, the Federal Aviation Administration is still weighing safety concerns. 

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Topic: Amazon

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4 comments
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  • That explains it

    Ordered two LPs on Friday, and got a text from them saying it was delivered. On Sunday. So, I thought it was a mistake but when I got up for a break during Talladega, turned out my KISS fix was indeed on the front porch. Could get used to this.
    jwspicer
  • That sucks

    Not for me but for the workers that have to be up on Sunday and not resting. Does America ever vacation at all? And I mean outside the local town borders?
    Zig1994
    • Many Americans appreciate the extra work

      Days off don't have to be fixed at Saturday and Sunday; in fact, for most of us in America, it's better such a common 'weekend' were NOT our day off. Too much traffic. So to be able to have other days off, is a boon.
      brainout
    • Not if folks need the work ...

      I was impressed that it's through the US Postal Service, which has long whined that it has been losing business due to email.

      I'm impressed that they figured out "Hey, if we work on Sunday, we'll be the only ones doing that and could gain a lot of business that way."

      If I worked for the USPS, I'd be pretty happy about not worrying so much about upcoming rounds of layoffs. Heck, the USPS could potentially work more shifts and do night deliveries, too.

      How ironic would that be if the thing that nearly killed the USPS -- the internet -- is the same thing that could save it?

      With the USPS' delivery capabilities, who needs drones?
      imalugnut