Amazon makes unified log-in play: Commerce vs. social identities

Amazon makes unified log-in play: Commerce vs. social identities

Summary: What's interesting about Amazon's move is that it's putting a commerce-based identity against a consumer's social registration.

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Amazon on Wednesday launched an effort called Login with Amazon, which is designed to allow people to use their e-commerce identity as their primary Internet identity.

The move puts Amazon in competition with efforts by Twitter and Facebook to use their social identities as a log-in vehicle for other sites.

Amazon's new service allow 200 million customers to log in to apps, games and sites. Amazon plugs its log in service as a way to "reduce sign-in friction."

For starters, Login with Amazon will work with Zappos and Woot, which are subsidiaries of the e-commerce giants. Developers are likely to include Amazon's identity system, which is based on OAuth 2.0, because the company has a big audience of users.

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The login system behaves like Facebook's. Amazon's service will work on the Web, Android and Apple's iOS.

What's interesting about Amazon's move is that it's putting a commerce-based identity against a consumer's social registration. The big question is whether consumers will use Amazon's login system over Facebook, Google or Twitter and in what circumstances.

Overall, consumers are likely to mix and match, but don't be surprised if Amazon grabs a chunk of the login pie.

Topics: Software Development, Amazon, E-Commerce

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  • How about neither?

    My Amazon login is for *Amazon*...not Facebook, Yahoo Mail, Gmail, or any other online service that I use. And no, they don't *need* to know what I search for, read, or visit on the Internet to specifically target ads at me, because a) I don't buy anything (online or in person) without first researching it, b) if I buy a book or DVD, it's because I've either already read/watched it & know that I want to keep it or I've read/watched the prior book/DVD & liked it enough that I'm committed to the series. Pushing me targeted ads not only doesn't increase my likelihood of buying the items advertised, but *decreases* my interest in using the site targeting me for my online purchase.

    It's also the same reason that I can count on my hand the times I've clicked on a Facebook ad: I don't use Facebook for shopping, nor am I interested in oversharing that much with my family & friends on Facebook like that.
    spdragoo@...