Amazon's Fire Phone hardware specification

Amazon's Fire Phone hardware specification

Summary: As we'd expect from Amazon, we have a device built using quality but widely used parts, but with the emphasis put on delivering a product that is itself unique, functional and tightly bound to the Amazon ecosystem.

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TOPICS: Mobility, Amazon
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(Source: James Martin/CNET)

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has confirmed that the company has indeed been working on a smartphone. Called the Fire Phone, it is the latest addition to Amazon's growing hardware ecosystem.

Let's take a look at the specs:

  • Quad-core 2.2GHz processor
  • Adremo 330 GPU
  • 2GB RAM
  • 4.7-inch IPS 1,280 x 720 retina display with 315 pixels-per-inch, dynamic contrast and circular polarizer for outdoor use (the rumored 3D display turns out to be a software-driven dynamic perspective effect as opposed to true 3D) 
  • Gorilla Glass 3 scratch-resistant screen with rubber frame
  • 13MP rear-facing camera with F2.0 five element lens (giving it good low-light capability) and optical stabilization, and can capture full HD video at 30FPS
  • Four 120-degree field-of-view front-facing cameras with IR illumination for head tracking for the dynamic perspective feature
  • Sensors include: Dynamic Perspective sensor system with invisible infrared illumination, gyroscope, accelerometer, magnetometer, barometer, proximity sensor, ambient light sensor
  • Fire OS 3.5
  • Dual-stereo speakers
  • Tangle-free flat cabled headphones
  • 2400mAh battery offering 22 hours of talk time, up to 285 hours of standby, up to 11 hours of video playback, and up to 65 hours of audio playback.
(Source: James Martin/CNET)

If you follow smartphones then most of the above will be familiar to you. As we'd expect from Amazon, we have a device built using quality  but widely used parts, but with the emphasis put on delivering a product that is itself unique, functional and tightly bound to the Amazon ecosystem.

The screen is, and is always the case with Amazon products, the highlight. It is a 4.7-inch industry-leading ultra-bright display making the handset suited to use in bright sunshine. It features dynamic image contrast to keep the image clear – as opposed to just altering the brightness which is what most smartphones do) and also features a circular polarizer to reduce glare.

The camera too is a big feature. The F2.0 lens gives it excellent low-light capability, beating what Apple and Samsung can go in tests carried out by Amazon.

It's clear that Amazon has once again put the hardware focus on the bit that users see the most – the screen.

Amazon Fire Phone is priced at $199 for 32GB ($625 without service plan) and $299 for 64 GB ($749 without plan) on AT&T (both subject to contract). The handset doesn't feature a micro SD card slot, so if you want premium storage you'll have to pay the $100 premium for it. Available for pre-order now for delivery starting July 25, 2014.

(Source: Amazon)

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Topics: Mobility, Amazon

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11 comments
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  • Just another meh phone.

    .
    Owl:Net
    • And Another Ecosystem

      However, I find this one useful. It is not about tech or entertainment as much as it is about every thing. Tech and entertainment are just one of many components.
      MichaelInMA
  • "4.7-inch industry-leading ultra-bright display"

    What does that translate to in terms of resolution?
    Boothy_p
    • Read the Article

      This is put in the article if you would read it: "4.7-inch IPS 1,280 x 720 retina display with 315 pixels-per-inch, dynamic contrast and circular polarizer for outdoor use"
      MichaelInMA
      • Ah, been added to the article

        Since I wrote the comment.
        Thanks for the eloquent response.
        Boothy_p
  • Not impressed.

    Changing the display perspective using sensors that recognise where the face is, is not so new, nor is it impressive, even if it is "super hard". And I suspect that while it is a novelty and cool when viewing a catalogue photo of a product, it is actually quite annoying for other cases.

    As for the rest of the phone, seems to me to be yet another high-end Android device that just fragments the Android world more, and introduces yet another ecosystem to the mix. Amazon might have done better to pimp its ecosystem on devices across platforms rather than go it alone.
    exeusdev
  • Cost = Ouch!

    Seems the Google Nexus 5 is a better value at a bit more than half the cost.
    robradina@...
    • Apple might be worried

      Without removable storage it's actually quite comparable to iPhones, but with twice the storage at the same price points, I'm guessing that Apple will have to respond with whatever their new hardware is. Their 16GB units just aren't going to cut it any more storage wise.
      Ben_E
      • Price = iPhone?

        So what. The iPhone is ridiculously expensive too. I paid the iPhone premium for four years and I finally decided to exit that train. My first iPhone, the fantastic 3G, was rendered useless by two iOS upgrades (2->3->4) and insufficient memory. Turned it into a pile. My second iPhone, the even more impressive iPhone 4 was rendered a ridiculous pile by two more iOS upgrades (4->5->6). Both were excellent devices but I wasn't about to pay for another two friggin' years of ATT. I'm currently tolerating a Nokia 620 because it only cost me $50 and enabled me to get on a post-paid Straight Talk plan. It's certainly cheap and limited but I definitely got every bit of what I paid for it. No way I'd go back to contract phones and no way I'd pay $700 for a phone. I can buy a decent laptop/tablet combo for that. People are nuts to spend that kind of money on a phone when things like Google's Nexus 5 are available for half the cost, almost no compromises, unlocked, no contract needed and the freedom to choose any carrier you want.

        You know what they say -- there are suckers born every minute and if millions buy this phone, there's proof the saying underestimates the birth rate of suckers.
        robradina@...
  • I wonder where the tin-foil hat parade is.

    The NSA is gonna love this thing...

    Jokes aside, locking it to AT&T is a pretty big mistake in my opinion.

    What I'm really worried about however, is the bloatware that they'll stick on this thing.

    They're not as bad as Verizon, but let's hope that it they won't bog the phone down with useless baggage.
    ForeverCookie
  • streaming services

    Would've been a real game changer if they made Prime streaming not count against your data limits.
    Medfordhouse