AMD unveils new A-series and E-series APUs offering more power and less power consumption

AMD unveils new A-series and E-series APUs offering more power and less power consumption

Summary: AMD debuts new silicon, including the world's first 28-nanometer, quad-core x86 SoC APU aimed at small touch-enabled notebooks, tablets and hybrids.

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California-based chipmaker AMD has revealed three new additions to its A-Series and E-Series APU lineups. This new silicon is designed to bring increased performance and lower power consumption.

The new silicon is divided into three categories.

First up is the 2013 AMD Elite Mobility APU, the world's first 28-nanometer, quad-core x86 SoC APU aimed at small touch-enabled notebooks, tablets and hybrids with a screen 13-inches and smaller. These parts come in dual (A4) and quad-core (A6) configurations, and feature a "Jaguar" x86 CPU cores along with Graphics Core Next AMD Radeon HD 8000 Series GPUs. There's full 1080p and Windows 8 support, including support for the upcoming Windows 8.1 'Blue.'

According to AMD, Elite Mobility APUs (formerly codenamed "Temash") offer up to 172 percent more CPU performance per watt, and up to 212 percent better graphics performance per watt than its predecessor. In terms of battery life, they offer up to 12 hours of what AMD calls "resting life."

In terms of the competition (which in this case is an Intel Atom Z2760 1.5GHz CPU along with Intel integrated graphics), they offer up to 45 percent longer battery life and nearly five times more GPU performance.

Interestingy, as was announced earlier this week, Microsoft's new Xbox One is powered by an 8-core AMD APU based on the "Jaguar" architecture.

Next up is the 2013 AMD Mainstream APU (formerly codenamed "Kabini"). These are described as offering the "best-in-class graphics and first-in-class x86 quad core SoC" and AMD claims they deliver "the ideal balance between function and affordability for entry-level and small-form factor touch notebooks."

These APUs feature either two (E1 and E2 models) or four (A4 and A6 models) "Jaguar" x86 CPU cores and a Graphics Core Next AMD Radeon HD 8000 Series GPU.

According to AMD's figures, this silicon offers up to 132 percent better visual performance per watt and up to 127 percent better productivity performance per watt. Also available is up to 25 percent better power efficiency than previous generations.

On the battery life front, these processors deliver 11 hours of idle run time.

In terms of the competition, AMD claims that these Mainstream APUs offer up to 88 percent better graphics performance, up to 33 percent better gaming performance, and up to 29 percent faster file compression than the competition (an Core i3-2370M with Intel HD graphics).

Finally, there's the 2013 AMD Elite Performance APU (formerly codenamed "Richland"). These are AMD's top-of-the-line A-Series APUs that come in A8 and A10 variants and are based on the "Piledriver" architecture. These, claim AMD, deliver the best graphics and compute in a performance APU, including elite performance and battery life.

AMD's figure say that this silicon offers up to 12 percent better productivity performance and between 20 and 40 percent better visual performance than the previous generation, including up to 51 percent more power efficiency in HD video playback and up to 13 hours of resting battery life.

They also offer between 39 and 72 percent better gaming performance on today’s leading games than the competition (in this case an Intel Core i5-3210M with Intel HD 4000 graphics).

"The client market has evolved – with greater diversity in the types of mobile form factors and higher performance demands from the software – and AMD is uniquely positioned to deliver the best processors to meet the needs of mobile device users today," wrote Lisa Su, senior vice president and general manager, Global Business Units at AMD in a statement to ZDNet. "As computing becomes more visual and the graphics processor can be leveraged to do other types of processing, our dedication to the software community and the APU architecture sets us apart from the competition and enables us to deliver the best user experience whether on a tablet, a hybrid device or a notebook."

Also debuted are a range of what AMD are calling "mobile APU user experiences" which include gesture control, facial login, and Start Now technology. 

Topics: Mobility, Hardware, Laptops, Processors

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8 comments
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  • Resting life?

    Resting life? Is this the latest euphemism for 'not doing anything useful?'
    epobirs
    • Yes, yes it is.

      It's simple. They pick the metric that looks the best for them instead of a metric that will actually be useful. Perhaps more useful benchmarks are in order. For normal people, perhaps hours of video playback will be useful. Or hours of continuous web browsing (for benchmarks sake, make it load the same page over and over at a regular interval matching some average amount of time people spend on a page). For engineers, it could be battery life whilst performing CAD computations on the Burj Dubai.

      (getting a very high "resting life" isn't very hard -- just make the clock speed and voltage drop down low when there isn't a workload. It's getting high life while doing something useful that is hard.)
      Jacob VanWagoner
  • I'd love to have one

    Wow, those numbers look great. I'd love to have a hybrid with AMD APU and Windows 8, faster than the Atom ones and (I think so) cheaper.

    Hope that now the prices of Hybrids/convertibles get lowered.
    pablocampis
  • APU's are awesome!

    I have a base model one in my HTPC and it runs nicely! its very quick when chewing through anything I might throw at it and I can even play some steam games on there with no issues! (Like the new Trackmania). And everything is in 1080p!
    Jimster480
  • Great News

    The new available thermal envelopes offering will allow hobbyists to build a whole new range of computers using very low power while still being able to crunch some stuff.

    The A6-5400 looks very interesting. Can't wait to build a new 15W (TDP) home server.
    TheCyberKnight
    • Mistake!

      I meant the A4-5000 APU.
      TheCyberKnight
  • Upgrade to my machine?

    I'm using an old acer with an AMD E-350 processor and 6gb of ram. I use it for lightroom and for playing torchlight 2. It's kinda slow but I can't complain because it only costed $350. My questions is: are these APUs much better than the one I have? How much better do you guys think torchlight 2 and lightroom 4 would run on this? Should I be expecting this APUs to be put in a bigger laptop than the one I use now (15.6 inch 5lbs)? Thanks, Regards!
    truthsforme
  • They're making *that* comparison?

    "AMD claims that these Mainstream APUs offer up to 88 percent better graphics performance, up to 33 percent better gaming performance, and up to 29 percent faster file compression than the competition (an Core i3-2370M with Intel HD graphics)."

    They're comparing their new thing to something 2 generations old. How does it compare to a Haswell i3?
    Jacob VanWagoner