Apple brings Nokia patent battle to UK courts

Apple brings Nokia patent battle to UK courts

Summary: Apple has sued Nokia in the UK over nine unspecified patents, in an apparent continuation of a court battle that has been raging in the US for the last year

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TOPICS: Legal, Piracy
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Apple has sued Nokia in the UK over nine patents, in a continuation of the legal battle that has raged between the two companies in the US over the last year.

According to a statement from Nokia on Wednesday, "Apple's action is an unsurprising development, which seems designed to put pressure on the ongoing dialogue between both companies". It is not yet clear which patents are the subject of the suit.

Nokia was the first aggressor in the legal war, having sued Apple over the iPhone manufacturer's use of GSM, 3G and Wi-Fi patents in October 2009. Apple struck back with a countersuit in December 2009. In March 2010, a Delaware court put both lawsuits on hold to give the US International Trade Commission time to issue its own deliberation on the matter. Then, in May, Nokia expanded its original suit to include the iPad as well as the iPhone.

According to a Nokia spokesperson, Apple's UK suit "changes nothing in the fundamentals of the matter, which are rooted in Apple's refusal to respect Nokia's intellectual property and attempt to free ride on the back of Nokia's innovation".

"We are examining Apple's claims, which appear to be based on nine implementation patents already in suit between the two companies in the US," Nokia said. "Though litigation is always a last resort for Nokia, the company will continue to defend itself to the utmost."

Apple had not responded to a request for comment at the time of writing.

Topics: Legal, Piracy

David Meyer

About David Meyer

David Meyer is a freelance technology journalist. He fell into journalism when he realised his musical career wouldn't pay the bills. David's main focus is on communications, as well as internet technologies, regulation and mobile devices.

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3 comments
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  • If this was just Apple and Nokia going at it like snake and mongoose, then fair enough, but it isn't just Nokia suing Apple for patent infringements and intellectual theft.

    I hope the courts see sense and tax Apple's over-inflated bank accounts, then follow on with some anti-trust suits over their use of iTunes and the Apple Update malware.

    Apple need to be made to eat some humble pie after being told that they can't steal everything and then claim it as theirs and theirs alone.
    legoman-7dcfa
  • Nokia legal games again.

    e.g. This patent is an abstraction between a location mechanism (e.g. GPS) and a program using it.

    Claim 1, it's a computer
    Claim 2, it has some way of determining location (e.g. GPS)
    Claim 3, it runs a program that needs location (e.g. Navigation)
    Claim 4, some location data is more reliable than other location data
    Claim 5-31 , All ways of describing an API

    http://www.google.com/patents?id=xtLHAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

    There is no invention in this, they just wrote down what a location API (like the code in an existing Garmin) does.

    Which means that Nokia are trying to misuse the patent system again.

    I recall Nokia Software Patent tricks, they lobbied the EU, they claimed without software patents they couldn't justify investing in software. For years they churned out the same handsets, their UI got stale. Now they're getting stomped in the market, and suddenly they remember they need to invest in software again.

    Competition is a good thing, and Nokia should not be protected from it. The patent I looked at they invented none of that.
    guihombre
  • Nokia legal games again.

    e.g. This patent is an abstraction between a location mechanism (e.g. GPS) and a program using it.

    Claim 1, it's a computer
    Claim 2, it has some way of determining location (e.g. GPS)
    Claim 3, it runs a program that needs location (e.g. Navigation)
    Claim 4, some location data is more reliable than other location data
    Claim 5-31 , All ways of describing an API

    http://www.google.com/patents?id=xtLHAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4#v=onepage&q&f=false

    There is no invention in this, they just wrote down what a location API (like the code in an existing Garmin) does.

    Which means that Nokia are trying to misuse the patent system again.

    I recall Nokia Software Patent tricks, they lobbied the EU, they claimed without software patents they couldn't justify investing in software. For years they churned out the same handsets, their UI got stale. Now they're getting stomped in the market, and suddenly they remember they need to invest in software again.

    Competition is a good thing, and Nokia should not be protected from it. The patent I looked at they invented none of that.
    guihombre