ARM study: The Internet of Things is real. It's here. Act now.

ARM study: The Internet of Things is real. It's here. Act now.

Summary: The processor maker has backed a new report that declares, quite simply, "The Internet of Things is an idea whose time has finally come."

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SAN FRANCISCO---Compared to the infancy years for cloud computing alone, the Internet of Things concept is gaining both attraction and acceptance far quicker, based on a new report published by ARM.

Introduced amid an invite-only discussion on Monday morning, the processor maker has backed a new report that declares, quite simply, "The Internet of Things is an idea whose time has finally come."

In fact, the topic appears to be more relevant than just debate fodder as researchers found that more than two-thirds of businesses are either in the process of incorporating Internet of Things practices if they haven't already implemented them.

"Nobody knows what the winning business models are going to be. Even seasoned management consultants will struggle to provide definitive answers. It is a matter of experimenting with different models to see which ones work."

Based on the report, integrating the Internet of Things appears to mean implementing a combination of cloud, mobile and social services in order to both handle as well as make use of the abundant amounts of data being generated by these sources.

Taking big data into account as an actual pressing issue rather than just a buzzphrase is essential given how many forecasts are predicting there will be anywhere between 20 billion and 50 billion connected devices worldwide by 2013.

Thus, it could be a welcome relief that researchers found approximately 96 percent of businesses expect to be using the IoT in some respect within the next three years.

However, it's obvious that it's going to take some serious commitment to get there -- some of which doesn't seem to be in place yet given that only 30 percent of organizations surveyed have committed "double-digit" investment to these infrastructures.

Naturally, there has to be room for understanding here between budget constraints and simply just being uncertain about making these investments given how quickly these technologies -- especially mobile -- evolve from year to year.

Here's some advice from the report:

Yet some important unknowns remain. Nobody knows what the winning business models are going to be. Even seasoned management consultants will struggle to provide definitive answers. It is a matter of experimenting with different models to see which ones work. The main message for latecomers and doubters is to consider the opportunities offered by the IoT—if nothing else for improving internal operations: the vast majority of survey respondents agree that companies that are slow to integrate the IoT risk falling behind the competition.

For reference, The Economist's Intelligence Unit, commissioned by ARM, surveyed 779 senior business leaders, nearly half of whom are C-level executives or board members, in June, covering a total of 19 industries across North America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and the Asia-Pacific region.

Images via ARM/The Economist Intelligence Unit

Topics: Networking, Hardware, Mobility, Unified Comms, Tech Industry

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  • The Internet of Things

    Sounds like some sort of totalitarians heaven.
    Bill4
    • sort of?

      main sort....
      ljenux
      • IoT Asia

        It believe this convergence of technologies has potential.

        www.internetofthingsasia.com
        Oliver Tian
    • LOL ARM STUDY ...

      Nuff said. Hurry buy our ARM product before its too late, i.e. before Intel renders us irrelevant, time is running out act fast.
      greywolf7
  • The Internet of all things

    The Nsa's wet dream
    Alan Smithie
  • Cloud and More Cloud..

    I think the NSA should go into Cloud hosting and provide those services for free. That way the get all the big data they want without having to use secrecy!
    simmi@...
  • The dependability of surveys

    Surveys show that when CIO types are asked about "cool" technologies, they are dramatically more likely to respond that they're already in "investigation" mode, as compared to when asked about mundane but important and financially impactful technologies.
    daboochmeister
    • Asking the question biases the answer.

      Even if the CIO has no idea what the survey is talking about, they'll say it's under evaluation. Then, they immediately go back to the office and Google the term to figure out what they were discussing. It's a matter of maintaining appearances. A CIO can't afford to look like he's not up on the latest technology trends, whether those trends are actually useful, or not. To keep their jobs, they need to appear just as informed as every other CIO at their competitors' companies. This fact is why the media can affect CIO focus so easily by spouting buzzwords.

      The survey, simply by asking the question, created a situation where the CIO had to improvise the appearance of being "in the know." Therefore, asking the question biased the answers. Ask them if they're evaluating the innovative new "trumpet protocol" and they'll say yes, whether it actually exists or not.
      BillDem
  • (rolling eyes)

    The next wave of hype.

    Given that we can't even secure *capable* computers (ie real machines that can do large amounts of computation, and yes, I include tablets, sigh) how do you expect a toaster to stay secure over the internet? :)

    Fix security *first*. Oh wait, that's an NP hard problem...
    Ardwolf
    • it's not

      just stop using windows

      you did 99% of the work.
      as for the 15 you will learn it along the way.
      ljenux
      • I'd hardly call

        OS-X (aka BSD), iOS, Android or any variation of Linux "more secure" than Windows. The reason Windows gets the viruses is that hackers are looking for something with the highest market share. The others are still vulnerable to viruses and all sorts of other security failures.
        Jacob VanWagoner
      • windows ?

        The last I heard the biggest news in hacking was the "unnamed" smart tv running a version of Linux as ROOT and it had video and audio capture! You can't regulate or legislate stupid so I say keep out of my world.
        sail422@...
    • Refrigerator security more important

      There is not much that hackers can do to your Internet toaster, except possibly burn your bread, but most people I think would want to keep that NSA out of the refrigerator. If something is connected to the Internet, does that make it better? I try to keep my computing devices as an independent of the Internet as possible. Will an Internet connected refrigerator do a better job keeping my food cold? Will an Internet connected washer result in cleaner clothes? I can see the advantages for certain businesses, if every refrigerator and washing machine etc. is connected to the Internet, but what advantages will the consumer have?
      arminw
  • i meant

    1% not 15
    ljenux
    • You meant...

      ...you were an idiot 100% of the time
      cramthat
      • iDiot

        ... is the correct way of spelling it, I think.
        wkeja
  • Go read "Trillions" ...

    ... to see how people are really seeing this could work in the future (Wiley publication)
    davidnrothwell
  • Full speed ahead

    We'll build in the security later.
    ejhonda
  • ARM a maker?

    I thought ARM designed the chips and others actually made them.
    PhilM