A trusted Linux milestone

Fedora users will have the security capabilities while the feds are still evaluating it, and their implementations could easily beat that of the feds to market, assuming code works as advertised.

Red Hat, IBM and Trusted Computer Solutions plan to put out a version of Linux the CIA can love late next year.

This is something Microsoft has been promising for a decade, but as of the summer, had still failed to deliver.

In order to gain this certification an operating system has to go through the National Information Assurance Partnership's Common Criteria evaluation program. This means it has to pass a number of security clearances, and have a number of security levels, so spies and non-spies can be on the same network, but the non-spies can't see what they're not entitled to see.

What's most interesting to me is that a lot of the needed code will be placed on Red Hat's Fedora system as early as October. This means Fedora users will have the security capabilities while the feds are still evaluating it, and their implementations could easily beat that of the feds to market, assuming code works as advertised.

Am I the only person worried about this?

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
See All
See All