AFACT to pay 60% of iiNet legal costs

The Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft (AFACT) yesterday won a small victory in its legal battle against iiNet, with the Federal Court deciding that the organisation only had to pay 60 per cent of iiNet's legal costs for lost court cases.

The Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft (AFACT) yesterday won a small victory in its legal battle against iiNet, with the Federal Court deciding that the organisation only had to pay 60 per cent of iiNet's legal costs for lost court cases.

The federation, which represents a number of film and television studios, had brought a case against iiNet in 2008, alleging that it had authorised its users to download and upload pirated content. The court ruled against AFACT in the case; however, the federation appealed.

It lost the appeal as well; however, many determinations made by the judge in the original case had been overturned. It was because of this, according to AFACT spokesperson Rebecca Tabakoff, that AFACT was seeking to only pay 20 per cent of iiNet's court costs.

The court didn't go that far; it ruled that AFACT only had to pay 60 per cent.

"We would have preferred a larger portion of reimbursement," iiNet spokesperson Tim Grau said, though he pointed out that, at the end of the day, a significant portion of the case was being paid for by the studios.

Newsletters

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.
See All