Alan Jones’ NBN confusion

Summary:When he’s not insulting the Prime Minister, shock-jock Alan Jones is busy ensuring that his listeners avoid the intricacies of the debate on publicly funded broadband.

The Australian media has been in overdrive this week, reporting on the fallout of Alan Jones' comments at a Young Liberals dinner at the University of Sydney late last month. Saying the Prime Ministers' dad had died of shame for the lies his daughter told, is not only tasteless, but also a little rich from a man who only ever tells one side of the story.

In this week's Twisted Wire podcast, we look at how Jones has approached the government's broadband policy over the years.

There are some fundamental questions about the Labor approach — how far should we roll out fibre? Should the cost of regional broadband be assisted by straight government subsidy, or by cross subsidisation from other users? Should the NBN focus purely on regional Australia, and leave market forces to operate in contestable areas?

These are all questions the federal opposition is asking, but strangely, their shock-jock stooge seems to be clouding the debate with throw away remarks about the cost of the exercise — do we need faster broadband, how wireless will do a better job, and how the Germans can offer broadband speeds up to 26 million megabits per second.

The greater travesty is not that Alan Jones made a clumsy remark at a Liberal orgy of self-aggrandisement, it's that, day after day, he only ever tells one side of the story.

Running time: 24 minutes and 22 seconds.

Topics: NBN, Networking, Telcos

About

Phil Dobbie has a wealth of radio and business experience. He started his career in commercial radio in the UK and, since coming to Australia in 1991, has held senior marketing and management roles with Telstra, OzEmail, the British Tourist Authority and other telecommunications, media, travel and advertising businesses.

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.