AMD's Turion is for thin and light? Yeah right!

Summary:One sidebar to my last blog -- a discussion of Vista testing as well as a walk down memory lane -- was that when I decided to get an AMD 64-bit Turion-based notebook, my assumption was that I'd be able to find something in the 4-5 pound range.  After all, according to AMD's positioning of the Turion, the 64-bit capable mobile processor is positioned for the thin and light notebook market.

One sidebar to my last blog -- a discussion of Vista testing as well as a walk down memory lane -- was that when I decided to get an AMD 64-bit Turion-based notebook, my assumption was that I'd be able to find something in the 4-5 pound range.  After all, according to AMD's positioning of the Turion, the 64-bit capable mobile processor is positioned for the thin and light notebook market.  So, I was a bit suprised to learn that the two major US domestic Turion contenders -- Acer's Ferarri 4005 and HP's nx6125 -- wieghed in at 6.2 lbs and 6.0 pounds, respectively.  I purchased the former.  But these are not thin and light notebooks by any stretch of the imagination.  Their closer to being heifers.  So, I wrote to AMD to get it's take on the mismatch between the chip's positioning and the way vendors were using it.  Here's how a spokesperson replied:

You are absolutely correct that AMD Turion 64 mobile technology is designed to deliver industry-leading AMD64 performance in thinner and lighter notebook PCs with longer battery life, enhanced security, and compatibility with the latest wireless and graphics technologies.

However, as a customer-centric company, AMD realizes that there is a wide range of needs and usage models among notebook PC buyers. AMD works with leading chipset and wireless solution partners to develop an ecosystem of best-of-breed technologies, including solutions optimized for thin and light systems. In this way, AMD provides its customers the flexibility to offer mobile solutions that meet the needs of the particular markets they serve, in terms of PC size, weight, features, price, battery life and performance.

In other words, go ahead you notebook manufacturers out there.  Put it in any ole' notebook you please and to heck with the original positioning!  Or, am I missing something?

Topics: Hardware

About

David Berlind was fomerly the executive editor of ZDNet. David holds a BBA in Computer Information Systems. Prior to becoming a tech journalist in 1991, David was an IT manager.

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