Analyst's "don't implement VoIP" screed sounds like "hey, hire me"

There's nothing wrong with craving attention and telling the world, "hey, look at me." I did so in the crib, and am still doing so now at the very moment I type these words.

There's nothing wrong with craving attention and telling the world, "hey, look at me." I did so in the crib, and am still doing so now at the very moment I type these words.

When you are a journalist or an analyst, sometimes the best way to get attention is to say things that are provocative and flaunt conventional wisdom. You don't want to say things that are too far out, but if you can make assertions that sound credible and are different than the CV, well, then, that company might hire you as a consultant or that editor may give you an assignment.

These truisms came to mind this morning as I read Five Reasons Not To Implement VoIP. The article on the Networking Pipeline Web site is largely built around the somewhat true, but arguably alarmist assertions of Info-Tech Research analyst Carni Levy.

The five reasons? "Internet Insecurity," "Shifting Regulatory Sands", "The Upgrade Cost," "Bad Timing" and "The Skills Gap."

I've read this piece twice, and it seems the critical flaw is a type of reasoning that cautions against VoIP adoption until everything is perfect.

Nothing is ever perfect in technology. The Internet will always have some insecurity, regulations are always "shifting," upgrades are costly, the timing can always be better and the skills can always be more plentiful and refined. 

Yet if you go about your IT life being risk-averse to the point of "what if" overcaution, you're gonna cost your organization some worthy solutions.

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