Appistry to fortify MS' IronPython code with its tensile fabric tech

Summary:Appistry (formerly Tsunami Research) is one of my favorite cool technology companies.  Perhaps my most favorite of 2005 and this should be a really great year for them once a few more big shops discover what this company can do with ordinary iron (think dirt cheap or recycled PCs).

Appistry (formerly Tsunami Research) is one of my favorite cool technology companies.  Perhaps my most favorite of 2005 and this should be a really great year for them once a few more big shops discover what this company can do with ordinary iron (think dirt cheap or recycled PCs).  The company's motto should probably be something like: You don't need no steenkin Xeons!. For more on why, you can read what I wrote last year (see Why by Xeons when Wal-Mart Pentium 4's will do) and listen to the associated podcast interview with company veep Sam Charrington.  Also, see Appistry upgraded from 'snake oil' to BEHOLD.

 While there was a ton of coverage over the way Microsoft embraced the Python scripting language (with its IronPython announcement), the smaller companies that like to ride the coattails of such announcements usually get overlooked.  Appistry is one of them.  Whereas Appistry was previously supporting C, C++, Java, C#, and VB.NET (support means that programmers must wrap code segments with code that calls Appistry's fabric), the company is once again innovating by announcing support for Python (via IronPython) while Microsoft's solution is still in beta.  Python and the Web applications that are driven by it are exactly the sort of technologies that can benefit from the performance and fault-tolerant fortifications that Appistry brings to the table. 

As a side note, if LAMP stands for Linux-Apache-MySQL-Python (at least for the purposes of this story), what is it when you switch to Windows, Internet Information Server, SQL Server, and Python? WISP?

Topics: Software Development

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David Berlind was fomerly the executive editor of ZDNet. David holds a BBA in Computer Information Systems. Prior to becoming a tech journalist in 1991, David was an IT manager.

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