Asetek develops liquid-cooled all-in-one desktop PC prototype

Summary:All-in-one PCs have been classified as "kitchen PCs" or "mom PCs" because they emphasize a space-saving form factor and ease of use over performance. That hasn't stopped Asetek, best known for creating budget liquid-cooling kits that companies like CoolIT and Corsair sell, from developing an all-in-one desktop prototype that receives a blast of water cooling.

All-in-one PCs have been classified as "kitchen PCs" or "mom PCs" because they emphasize a space-saving form factor and ease of use over performance. That hasn't stopped Asetek, best known for creating budget liquid-cooling kits that companies like CoolIT and Corsair sell, from developing an all-in-one desktop prototype that receives a blast of water cooling.

As the company details in its YouTube video, its 24-inch LED-backlit prototype features the type of components that don't usually get stuffed into an all-in-one framework, including an Intel Core i7-920 quad-core processor and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 280M graphics card. Using the mobile graphics board helps the prototype to remain the same size as an iMac at 2.3 inches thick. Nonetheless, thermal design power (TDP) output for this build reaches more than 200W, which could make all-in-one chassis a little toasty. The Asetek prototype, however, can handle the heat thanks to a radiator system and pump built into the case stand.

This new design could open up more all-in-one configurations from PC makers -- if they see a potential niche for more robust models. They'll already be competing with 27-inch iMacs that can be configured with a Core i7 CPU and ATI Radeon HD 4850 graphics without the need for liquid cooling, though those are priced at over $2,000. Likewise, the Sony Vaio J series features a $1,549 model with a Core i7-620M processor and GeForce 310M graphics, though with only a 21.5-inch display.

Asetek's prototype may need to handle newer, better-performing mobile graphics cards instead of the GTX 280M with the resulting PCs offered for lower prices in order to pique the interest of space-challenged gamers and video editors. Stay tuned and we'll let you know when and if anyone takes a chance on bringing a desktop to market based on this liquid-cooled solution.

Topics: Hardware

About

Sean Portnoy started his tech writing career at ZDNet nearly a decade ago. He then spent several years as an editor at Computer Shopper magazine, most recently serving as online executive editor. He received a B.A. from Brown University and an M.A. from the University of Southern California.

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