Aussie software pirates turn themselves in

The Business Software Association of Australia has described its 60-day Software Truce as “hugely successful”, with over 1150 companies signing up for immunity.

SYDNEY (ZDNet Australia)--The Business Software Association of Australia has described its 60-day Software Truce as “hugely successful”, with over 1150 companies signing up for immunity.

“The Truce has been hugely successful,” BSAA chairman Jim Macnamara told ZDNet.

“If over 1150 companies have registered, it raises the question of how many other companies have gone their own way and cleaned things up without formerly registering,” he added.

However, 125 companies now face investigation for alleged software piracy after failing to register and take advantage of the campaign, the BSAA has said.

“Companies have been given an excellent opportunity to clean up without legal action, if they’re caught now I don’t think there’s a court in the land would have sympathy for them,” BSAA chairman Jim Macnamara told ZDNet.

“We acknowledge the 1,151 companies who took the opportunity to get their house in order and introduce good software asset management. These companies can now have peace of mind knowing they are operating legally.”

The 125 companies who face investigation were reported for alleged software piracy during the Truce, they include 94 end users of software and 31 computer retailers or suppliers, according to the BSAA.

The BSAA said it is committed to taking legal action against these companies where evidence of illegal software is found.

Companies that registered during the Truce are now required to lodge a Software Compliance Statement with the BSAA to retain immunity.

“Businesses cannot simply register and then do nothing. They have to file a statement saying they have checked their software and found nothing, or cleaned up,” Macnamara said.

During the 60-day Software Truce over 8,000 telephone calls and emails were handled by the BSAA hotline.

“We are pleased to see that so many companies responded positively to the opportunity the Truce gave them to get compliant without fear of prosecution,” Macnamara said.

“Now it’ll be back to taking legal action.”

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