Birst, Tableau team up with business analytics integration

Birst CEO Jay Larson acknowledged in prepared remarks that some observers might be confused given that the two companies are "typically seen as competitors."

Birst and Tableau Software have established a new partnership, bridging their respective cloud analytics platforms.

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The bulk of the data, which essentially serves as the foundation for this collaboration, will come from Birst's cloud-based troves of business intelligence information.

That data will be then piped into Tableau's infrastructure and visualized for interpretation and insight with the hope of inciting better business decisions in the long run.

Dan Jewett, vice president of product management at Tableau, explained in Wednesday's announcement that the connection between Birst and Tableau will elevate "the analytics experience for customers."

Birst's cloud-based approach to business intelligence has garnered attention from industry followers as it sources enterprise data -- particularly highly fragmented data sources -- while promising to keep service delivery costs manageable.

Birst CEO Jay Larson acknowledged in prepared remarks that some observers might be confused given that the two companies are "typically seen as competitors."

"The reality is that Birst's and Tableau's technologies are much more complementary than competitive," Larson argued, explaining this integration will mean less "trade-offs between speed, ease-of-use and data governance."

Tableau has been on an upswing lately finishing last quarter with 2,600 new customer accounts and closing 304 deals each worth more than $100,000 -- all in all producing $101.4 million in license revenue, up 75 percent annually.

A beta version of Tableau 9.0, the next iteration of the company's business intelligence and analytics software, was pushed out in January.

Amid a solid fourth quarter earnings report in February, Tableau CEO Christian Chabot championed 2014 as a year in which Tableau saw its highest demand ever, highlighting "accelerated growth in our enterprise business."

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