Boeing Dreamliner reliability issues frustrate customers

Boeing has admitted that the 787 Dreamliner has been plagued with reliability issues, and promises to fix the problem.

Boeing has admitted that the 787 Dreamliner comes with a host of reliability issues, and said steps are being taken to solve the problem.

The aircraft manufacturer admitted on Monday that the Dreamliner's reliability does not meet the company's standards, and the planes have to be made more dependable. Speaking at a press conference, Boeing Commercial Airplanes Marketing Vice President Randy Tinseth commented:

"Today, the reliability of the 787 is better than 95 percent. It’s not as good as we’d like to see it. It’s not as good as our customers would like to see it. So we’re looking at ways to improve that reliability over time.

I would refer to the problems as teething problems, I don’t think they're systemic."

The 787 Dreamliner has suffered a number of technical issues, and was grounded earlier this year by government officials in the U.S. and Europe following battery fires which forced a Japanese flight to perform an emergency landing. The battery compartment had to be completely redesigned before the fleet was allowed to take to the air once again.

However, more recently, budget airline Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA was forced to ground a brand new 787 Dreamliner following repeated breakdowns, and identification system issues forced LOT airline to land a Dreamliner without warning in Iceland.

While admitting the Dreamliner's reliability is a problem, the executive also said that improving the situation could take a long time. Tinseth said:

"Every plane that we bring to the market clearly or oftentimes has issues as we go through the maturation process. The 787 has been no exception to that.

Clearly we've had some challenges on 787 reliability and we’re focused on making that reliability better."

Via: Skift

Image credit: Boeing

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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