Calif. bills would ban RFIDs in student IDs

The controversy over whether students should carry indentification cards with tracking devices or radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) embedded in them rages on in the California State Senate.

The controversy over whether students should carry indentification cards with tracking devices or radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) embedded in them rages on in the California State Senate, reports the Mercury News.

There are several bills rolling through the Assembly that would ban the use of radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) in driver's licenses and school identification The bill's sponsor, State Sen. Joe Simitian (D) said: "Those are two very straightforward kinds of applications where there are easily understood concerns that are easier for members of the Legislature to wrap their heads around."

RFIDs are tiny chips that provide information by emitting radio signals alarmed. The chips have alarmed parents and civil libertarians who protested the possible implementation of RFIDs last year. The concern is that RFIDs could be misused, personal information stolen and privacy rights violated.

Supporters of the technology such as Carol Henton, a vice president with the Information Technology Association of America, says the devices can make schools and students safer. Her group is backing a rival bill by Assemblyman Alberto Torrico (D) that would require a study of how to prevent RFIDs from being used to violate privacy or steal personal information.

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