Camel sacrificed by airline workers

Summary:Generally speaking, camels are safe over here in Blighty, confined as they are to zoos, safari parks and the odd circus. Not the life your average member of the Camelidae might have chosen, perhaps, but better than falling into the hands of predatory Turkish Airlines workers at Istanbul's international airport.

Generally speaking, camels are safe over here in Blighty, confined as they are to zoos, safari parks and the odd circus. Not the life your average member of the Camelidae might have chosen, perhaps, but better than falling into the hands of predatory Turkish Airlines workers at Istanbul's international airport.

As the Beeb reports, an unfortunate beast — whether Dromedary (one hump) or Bactrian (two humps) was not specified — was recently slaughtered and consumed by maintenance workers to celebrate the final delivery in a 100-plane order. The authorities, however, took a dim view of such extreme staff canteen arrangements, and have suspended the boss of the workers involved.

Which gets me thinking: what's the oddest animal you've ever eaten? I've managed nothing more exotic than fried insects in Japan, washed down with fish tea. However, my brother, when on VSO in Sarawak many years ago, was disconcerted to find that the tasty meat being fed to him by friendly longhouse-dwelling tribesmen in the rainforest was the distinctly endangered Sun Bear.

Topics: Reviews

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Hello, I'm the Reviews Editor at ZDNet UK. My experience with computers started at London's Imperial College, where I studied Zoology and then Environmental Technology. This was sufficiently long ago (mid-1970s) that Fortran, IBM punched-card machines and mainframes were involved, followed by green-screen terminals and eventually the pers... Full Bio

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