CES 2015: Ultimaker unveils mobile 3D printer and higher volume model for small business

Ultimaker debuted two new 3D printers at CES 2015: a mini one made to travel, and its largest one yet, aimed at a small business setting.

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Three of Ultimaker's 3D printer models. The largest is aimed at the enterprise. Image: Ultimaker

Desktop 3D printers, which have been extremely popular with hobbyists and makers throughout the last year, are set to move into the workplace in 2015. At CES on Monday, the popular European 3D printing company Ultimaker unveiled two new desktop models, and one is aimed at the enterprise.

The Ultimaker2 Extended, priced at $3030, is made to print larger, more complex objects and fit seamlessly into a business setting. The Ultimaker2 Extended has a build volume about four inches larger than the company's other models -- it can print objects about 10 inches tall.

The Ultimaker2 Go, its complete opposite, is a compact, mini 3D printer built to fit anywhere -- particularly in the home -- and travel easily. It runs at $1450, which is quite a bit more than the MakerBot Mini, the most well-known baby 3D printer on the market. The new Ultimakers will be available for pre-order starting in March 2015.

Both these models are expansions upon the company's successful Ultimaker2, an open source printer with a heated bed that can print objects about eight inches tall. The Ultimaker2 costs $2500. Ultimaker, founded in 2011, also offers the Ultimaker Original+, an unassembled do-it-yourself kit. Users can design their own objects to print using CAD software or find them on YouMagine, then upload the designs via SD card onto the printer, or send them to the printer on Wi-Fi.

The Ultimaker2 has been praised for being one of the more quiet desktop printers, but like other consumer models, it still can't print very large objects, primarily uses PLA and ABS filament, and is quite pricey for a desktop 3D printer.

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