Cheyenne wants Microsoft bio-gas powered datacenter pilot project

Summary:Wyoming wants to be the home of Microsoft's waste-gas powered fuel cell driven datacenter pilot project

With Microsoft having announced plans to build a waste-gas powered datacenter test site, the city of Cheyenne, Wyoming thinks that they have the perfect location, and they are looking to get a grant from the Wyoming Business Council to help convince Microsoft that they are correct. Microsoft has already proposed building a full scale datacenter west of Cheyenne., looking to invest about $112 million in that project.

Microsoft is proposing the construction of a fuel cell-based system that would collect methane from a waste gas plant and generate approximately 300 kW of power. The proposed test data center would use 200 kW of that energy. The city is already producing methane at their Dry Creek Water Reclamation Facility and a datacenter located nearby with the fuel cell that would just tap into that gas produced by the facility’s biodigester.

The city’s hope is that the grant of $1.5 million would entice Microsoft into a public-private partnership with a number of public entities in Wyoming, ranging from the Board of Public Utilities to the University of Wyoming. The total cost of the project is projected at $7.6 million with the amount beyond that provided by the grant coming from Microsoft.

Topics: Data Centers

About

With more than 20 years of published writings about technology, as well as industry stints as everything from a database developer to CTO, David Chernicoff has earned the term "veteran" in the technology world. Currently the principal of an independent consulting business and an active freelance writer, David has most recently been a Seni... Full Bio

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