Cisco's largest optic fiber network in Asia Pacific

The completed third generation (3G) Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system in New Zealand is the largest DWDM system by Cisco Systems in the Asia Pacific.

The completed third generation (3G) Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM)system (in New Zealand, is the largest DWDM system by Cisco Systems in the Asia Pacific.

NEW ZEALAND - DWDM is a fiber optic technology that puts data from different sources together on an optical fiber, with each signal carried on its own separate light wavelength. Using DWDM, up to 80 separate wavelengths or channel of data can be multiplexing into a lightstream transmitted on a single optical fiber.

The multi-million project will serve as the core optical transport network for Telecom New Zealand to increase the speed and amount of data traffic, so as to meet the growth in data and voice. The system carries asynchronous transfer mode, internet protocol and synchronous digital hierachy traffic.

The new system has increased Telecom New Zealand's network transport capacity from 5 channels at 2.5Gbps on the previous T31 system up to 60 channels at 10 Gbps, according to Tim Hemingway, Cisco Systems' managing director for New Zealand.

The installation process was undertaken by Cisco Systems, ConnecTel (for outside fiber optic cabling) and Prime Communications Ltd (for the equipment installation) across fiber optic cable routes lining Telecom New Zealand's network from Auckland to Wellington.

The Cisco ONS15801 system was developed across 10 sites over two important Telecom New Zealand routes:

  • Western route - from Auckland through Hamilton, New Plymouth, Wanganui and Levin to Wellington, covering 787 km

  • Eastern route - Auckland through Paeroa, Taupo, Napier, Masterton to Wellington, covering 897 km.

    These 10 sites are supported by 19 Optical Line Amplifiers at intervals of approximately 80 km, which speeds up data traffic from rural centers, in addition to carrying Auckland-Wellington data traffic.

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