Computer companies scramble to deal with Intel's Sandy Bridge chipset defect

Summary:While Intel will bear the brunt of the damage from the SATA-port defect the company has detected in its new Sandy Bridge chipsets, other companies building products around the parts are having to perform damage control as well.Several PC manufacturers and component companies have already responded to the news of the defective parts.

While Intel will bear the brunt of the damage from the SATA-port defect the company has detected in its new Sandy Bridge chipsets, other companies building products around the parts are having to perform damage control as well.

Several PC manufacturers and component companies have already responded to the news of the defective parts. Here's a quick rundown of what they are each doing for consumers.

Have you purchased a Sandy Bridge product yet? If so, what are you going to do (if anything) about the defective chipset? If not, has this made you reconsider a Sandy Bridge-based PC? Let us know in the Comments section.

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Topics: Hardware, CXO, Intel, Processors

About

Sean Portnoy started his tech writing career at ZDNet nearly a decade ago. He then spent several years as an editor at Computer Shopper magazine, most recently serving as online executive editor. He received a B.A. from Brown University and an M.A. from the University of Southern California.

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