Countdown now ticking for Apple WWDC tickets

Summary:Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference is one of the few times in the year when Apple executives, programming teams, and third-party developers come together in person. With tickets expected to sell out in perhaps an hour, new ticket alert services are now online.

In 2011, tickets to the annual Apple Worldwide Developer Conference in San Francisco, California, sold out in 12 hours. Last year, it was down to two hours. There are only some 5,000 seats at the conference, and the demand is very, very high. And the rumors around the announcements that will be made are just starting to heat up.

Several recent blog posts point to availability services and monitoring applications. Adam Engst at TidBITS and developer Oliver Drobnik at Cocoanetics both expect WWDC Blast to do the job right. 

Drobnik writes:

All those options pale in comparison with the professionalism that can be had from WWDC Blast. Any kind of monitoring system's effectiveness depends on you noticing any alert notification. And this is their flaw. If you are on the wrong cost of the USA or some place else on our geoid that we call home, then email, push notifications, or SMS won't cut it.

What you really want is a friend who constantly refreshes the WWDC page and calls you the second there is action there. WWDC Blast is exactly that.

According to the WWDC Blast folks, their "proprietary technologies and engineered redundancy at every level of our stack ensure that when WWDC tickets go on sale, we'll be the first to know. And when we know, you'll know".

As I have mentioned before, Apple has three major hardware/software platforms on the market and is one of the biggest computing platform companies in the world, but only has one developer conference . Why is that?

Developers, enterprise, and government customers and education sites, as well as various market segments could use specific conferences. Or more than tracks at the current WWDC. That all the tickets for the conference are sold in a couple of hours isn't a good thing.

Topics: Apple, Software Development

About

David Morgenstern has covered the Mac market and other technology segments for 20 years. In the recent past, he founded Ziff-Davis' Storage Supersite, served as news editor for Ziff Davis Internet and held several executive editorial positions at eWEEK. In the 1990s, David was editor of Ziff Davis' award-winning MacWEEK news publication a... Full Bio

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