CTIA: Cell phones used more for data, texting rather than calls

A new CTIA study has found that most mobile phone owners are using their devices primarily for texting and browsing the Internet these days.

While the original purpose of a cell phone is to make phone calls, a new study shows that most mobile phone owners are using their devices primarily for texting and browsing the Internet these days.

As reported by the New York Times, the CTIA wireless industry association has found that the average number of voice minutes used per consumer in the U.S. has dropped, while the number of text messages sent per user in 2009 grew almost 50%. The report continues on that data usage (e-mail, Internet browsing, streaming video, etc.) has also surpassed the amount of phone calls on a mobile phone made last year.

Some of other quick stats include 90% of U.S. households have a cell phone, and the average length of a call was 1.81 minutes last year, down from 2.27 minutes in 2008.

Predictably, teenagers seem to text the most, with over half of the demographic sending a staggering 1,500 text messages per month.

Personally, I do prefer to text than call these days just for speed and ease of use, and I'm constantly checking my e-mail on my phone. But I probably hover around 100 text messages per month. I can't even imagine what warrants 1,500 texts per month for one user.

What do you use your cell phone for the most?

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