Energy plant hack all wind says operator

There's no proof that a suspected hacking attack on the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems of a Florida-based energy plant actually occurred, according to the operator, NextEra Energy Resources.

There's no proof that a suspected hacking attack on the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems of a Florida-based energy plant actually occurred, according to the operator, NextEra Energy Resources.

Moreover, it has claimed that the information posted on the Full Disclosure mailing list as evidence of the attack is already public.

The statements follow claims that a former employee who was illegitimately fired had sought revenge by hacking the system responsible for controlling parts of a 200-megawatt plant at the New Mexico Wind Farm.

The alleged attack was said to exploit holes in the Cisco security software used at the farm. The public post included screenshots of the SCADA system, reportedly the Siemens-designed WinCCC program.

"Here comes my revenge for illegitimate firing ... ain't nothing you can do with it, since your electricity is turned off !!!" the attacker wrote in the post.

But the attack is mere wind, according to NextEra Energy Resources.

"We have investigated the claim of a potential computer hacking and found that the information provided as proof of 'hacking' is largely publicly available information, which by itself would not be adequate to launch a successful attack against the named SCADA system or wind site," NextEra Energy Resources spokesman Steve Stengel told ZDNet Australia.

Stengel refused to identify what information was exposed that was not publicly available.

"We have not seen any evidence of a breach, and we are continuing our monitoring and detection to protect against possible attacks."

Meanwhile, users have found that the SCADA system can be accessed over the public internet and are debating whether it was truly a hack.

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