Find out which apps are destroying your iPhone or iPad battery life with Normal

Summary:While its easy to see how wi-fi, Bluetooth and screen brightness to rival a supernova can stress the iPhone or iPad's battery, there are hidden battery destroyers present on all iOS devices – apps.

Tens of millions of people every quarter pick the iPhone or iPad as their mobile device of choice, but what many find is that the more they use their device, the more limited the battery life feels.

With the right accessories you can easily inject more juice into the battery, and by disabling a few features – dropping the screen brightness, switching off wi-fi and Bluetooth when not needed, or putting the device into airplane mode – you can get more from the power left in the battery.

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By applying a few system tweaks, you can improve your iPhone's battery life considerably.

While its easy to see how wi-fi, Bluetooth and screen brightness to rival a supernova can stress the iPhone or iPad's battery, there are hidden battery destroyers present on all iOS devices – apps.

Apps have a great deal of freedom to carry on working in the background, downloading and processing data, and firing off alerts and notifications. While this is all cool, it takes a toll on the battery. Throw in the fact that an app might be inefficiently coded and a single app running in the background can have a massive effect on battery life.

Enter Normal by Kuro Labs. This $0.99 app runs in the background on your iPhone or iPad and collects and analyses data about the apps you have running. This anonymized data is uploaded to the cloud and compared with data collected from other iOS devices to "pinpoint the battery hogs on your device, tell you whether or not this is also happening to other people, and project by how much time you will extend the battery by killing each hog."

Normal also uses proprietary statistical algorithms designed at UC Berkeley’s AMP Lab – which has a similar app called Carat for both iOS and Android – to give the user suggested actions and statistics about the impact their apps are having on battery life.

Does it work?

In the testing I've carried out, it seems to identify apps which I had previously considered to be battery hogs – apps such as Facebook and Facebook's messenger – and the more I use Normal the better it seems to know my devices.

I feel like I've got my $0.99 worth already. However, if that price tag is a little rich for your blood, you could always check out Carat, which is free, but not as user-friendly as Normal.

See also:

Topics: Mobility, iOS, iPad, iPhone

About

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes is an internationally published technology author who has devoted over a decade to helping users get the most from technology -- whether that be by learning to program, building a PC from a pile of parts, or helping them get the most from their new MP3 player or digital camera.Adrian has authored/co-authored technic... Full Bio

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