First impression of Windows Phone 7: Samsung Omnia 7

Summary:Samsung Omnia 7 is one of the first phones to run the new Windows Phone 7 mobile operating system. I bought the phone from my mobile operator and used it as my primary work phone for the past week, switching over from the Apple iPhone 4.

Samsung Omnia 7 is one of the first phones to run the new Windows Phone 7 mobile operating system. I bought the phone from my mobile operator and used it as my primary work phone for the past week, switching over from the Apple iPhone 4.

Here's what I like about the phone:

  • The Omnia 7 looks like a serious business phone, with tapered sides and corners sharper than the iPhone. At 4 inches, the screen is noticeably larger than the iPhone. The AMOLED screen shows deep contrast and vibrant colours; it's really a joy to look at.

  • Windows Phone 7's user interface is snappy and unique--very business-like with wordy titles flying around. Actually it looks a bit like an over-animated PowerPoint slide with flying bullet points. No cute icons here like the iPhone, it's strictly business. According to a quick poll around the office, half liked the wordy user interface and half didn't.

  • You can edit Microsoft Word and Excel documents on the phone without installing any additional software, and the phone can be used with your company's SharePoint 2010 Server. Windows Phone 7 is really the best phone for working on Microsoft Office documents.

  • The lock screen on the phone shows you how many unread e-mail messages you got. I love this feature, which is sadly missing from the iPhone.

  • The phone has a good selection of paid, high-quality games at launch.

What I don't like about the phone:

  • The phone connects easily to Exchange Server for syncing e-mail, but I was unable to browse the corporate address book in my Exchange Server 2003. Apparently, it's a bug.

  • Unlike the iPhone, you can't connect to a Wi-Fi network whicj SSID is hidden. This may cause problems for some corporate networks.

  • I missed the apps that I use frequently on iPhone and Android phones, like LogMeIn, Dropbox and Angry Birds.

  • No copy-and-paste, no multitasking, no support for Flash yet. It's almost like using the first-generation iPhone.

If you're looking for a business phone that works well with Microsoft apps, the Samsung Omnia 7 may be the right phone for you.

Topics: Telcos, Collaboration, iPhone, Microsoft, Samsung, Servers, Smartphones, Windows

About

Lee Lup Yuen is passionate about mobile phones and PDAs, as he is constantly buying new gadgets and programming them in J2ME, .NET, Symbian and AppForge. He has developed commercial applications with mobile technologies like SMS, MMS, WAP, 3G video streaming and location-based services.

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