Foxconn to partner Tesla for US screen plant

Summary:Starting with Tesla's Model S, Foxconn's subsidiary screen maker plans to expand to the U.S. to gain a foothold for in-car displays.

The Taiwanese electronics giant Foxconn was reported to have reached a panel screen supply agreement with American electric car maker Tesla, cited a Economics Daily report published on Thursday.

Innolux, a Foxconn subsidiary and the second largest car panel screen maker in the world, was said to on course to provide Tesla cars, such as Model S, with 17-inch screens. The company's sales for 2013 was expected to reach 14 million pieces and its products could be found on BMW, Porsche, Jaguar, and Ford cars.

According to the report, Guo Taiming, chief executive officer of Foxconn, met Tesla's founder and CEO Elon Musk during his trip to the U.S. at the end of 2013, and was said to have settled the deal back then, however a spokesperson for Foxconn refused to comment on the issue.

Guo, who has been a keen fan of the automotive industry and put car electronics among Foxconn's future seven priorities, said previously that the company was considering setting up panel screen plants in the U.S., a move that was deemed by some to cater Tesla's increasing demand, as multiple states are competing to win the contract.

 

Topics: Tech Industry, Hardware, Travel Tech

About

Liu Jiayi is a Hong Kong-based writer and editor. He produces video stories for Al Jazeera English and Seven News Australia, and also worked as the video editor for the Hong Kong-San Francisco Ocean Film Festival 2012. He is studying under a Master of Journalism Programme at the University of Hong Kong.

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