Global village

Summary:Linux' growing popularity outside the U.S. means its software experts should learn a lot of languages.

Linux' growing popularity outside the U.S. means its software experts should learn a lot of languages.

Take German, for instance, the native tongue of Stefan Esser from e-matters security. It was e-matters that recently revealed a critical buffer overrun error in Samba, a crucial Linux file and print server in many shops that maintain Windows desktops.>

lso revealed critical problems with Cyrus, the Linux messaging server, and e-matters will continue to be a vital part of the Linux Security infrastructure.

But that's just the tip of the iceberg. Check out Linux lists you'll find a host of foreign languages written and spoken.

That's the way it works when anyone can be part of a solution. It's quite likely they won't speak your language, even if they're fluent in c.

If you're training an open source programmer at your home, make sure they study the languages of man, not just those of code.

Topics: Open Source

About

Dana Blankenhorn has been a business journalist since 1978, and has covered technology since 1982. He launched the Interactive Age Daily, the first daily coverage of the Internet to launch with a magazine, in September 1994.

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