Google Chrome vulnerable to carpet-bombing flaw

Summary:Google's shiny new Web browser is vulnerable to a carpet-bombing vulnerability that could expose Windows users to malicious hacker attacks.Just hours after the release of Google Chrome, researcher Aviv Raff discovered that he could combine two vulnerabilities -- a flaw in Apple Safari (WebKit) and a Java bug discussed at this year's Black Hat conference -- to trick users into launching executables direct from the new browser.

Google Chrome vulnerable to carpet-bombing flaw
Google's shiny new Web browser is vulnerable to a carpet-bombing vulnerability that could expose Windows users to malicious hacker attacks.

Just hours after the release of Google Chrome, researcher Aviv Raff discovered that he could combine two vulnerabilities -- a flaw in Apple Safari (WebKit) and a Java bug discussed at this year's Black Hat conference -- to trick users into launching executables direct from the new browser.

Raff has cooked up a harmless demo of the attack in action, showing how a Google Chrome users can be lured into downloading and launching a JAR (Java Archive) file that gets executed without warning.

[ SEE: Google Chrome, the security tidbits ]

In the proof-of-concept, Raff's code shows how a malicious hacker can use a clever social engineering lure -- it requires two mouse clicks -- to plant malware on Windows desktops.

The Google Chrome user-agent shows that Chrome is actually WebKit 525.13 (Safari 3.1), which is an outdated/vulnerable version of that browser.

Apple patched the carpet-bombing issue with Safari v3.1.2.

Some Google Chrome early adopters using Windows Vista are reporting that files downloaded from the Internet are automatically dropped on the desktop, setting up a scenario where a combo-attack using this unpatched IE flaw could be used in attacks.

Topics: Google, Apple, Browser, Operating Systems, Security, Software, Windows

About

Ryan Naraine is a journalist and social media enthusiast specializing in Internet and computer security issues. He is currently security evangelist at Kaspersky Lab, an anti-malware company with operations around the globe. He is taking a leadership role in developing the company's online community initiative around secure content managem... Full Bio

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