Google's glasses: Who's the idiot that would buy these?

Summary:The composite sketch of a Google glasses consumer isn't pretty.

Google is reportedly cooking up glasses that will be based on Android and feed information and data to your eyes in real time.

The New York Times' Nick Bilton writes:

According to several Google employees familiar with the project who asked not to be named, the glasses will go on sale to the public by the end of the year. These people said they are expected “to cost around the price of current smartphones,” or $250 to $600.

Bilton has a bunch of other details, but let's cut to the chase. These goggles are going to go over just like Google TV did. I can't help but think of the composite sketch of the person who would buy these things.

That composite sketch is a total dork.

  • Do you really need GPS in your glasses? No.
  • Do you really need a data connection in your eyes? Nope.
  • Are you really going to pay more than $100 for what essentially is a gag gift for nerds? No.
  • Do you want Google ads in your glasses (you know they're coming)?
  • Do you want data---not to mention tracking---following you around everywhere? Probably not.

In the end, it's hard to see how these Google glasses contribute much of anything. Even worse Google glasses threaten to take the life out of what should be a mindful walk in the park. Skip the goggles. Enjoy the walk.

Topics: Hardware, Google, Mobility, Smartphones

About

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and SmartPlanet as well as Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CN... Full Bio

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