Graphene research: shear forces to sheer displays

Summary:Lab tests have confirmed theoretical predictions about the shear and strain that single sheets of graphene can withstand, bringing industrial and commercial applications of the material a step closer.The two-dimensional, hexagonal lattice of carbon has piqued the interest of display and solar cell manufacturers because of its transparency and high conductivity.

Lab tests have confirmed theoretical predictions about the shear and strain that single sheets of graphene can withstand, bringing industrial and commercial applications of the material a step closer.

The two-dimensional, hexagonal lattice of carbon has piqued the interest of display and solar cell manufacturers because of its transparency and high conductivity.

Researchers at the University of Bristol explain that for graphene to live up to its promise in next generation displays or solar cells, in nanoelectromechanical resonators or nanosensors, its structure and mechanical limits need to be fully understood.

The scientists conducted their tests on graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition, or CVD.

The researchers found is that there is a striking difference between single and double layered graphene in both shear modulus and internal friction. The researchers speculate that this is due to the transition of the shear restoring force from chemical bonding within a layer to interlayer interactions.

The research is published in the January 3rd edition of Nano Letters here.

Topics: Graphene

About

Lucy Sherriff is a journalist, science geek and general liker of all things techie and clever. In a previous life she put her physics degree to moderately good use by writing about science for that other tech website, The Register. After a bit of a break, it seemed like a good time to start blogging about weird quantum stuff for ZDNet. An... Full Bio

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