Hackers infiltrate White House network

The Obama Administration has admitted that a cyberattacker was able to gain access to the US government's systems.

it-security

The Obama Administration has revealed that an unclassified computer network used by the US government was infiltrated by hackers.

Revealed by the New York Times, an unnamed White House official admitted systems used by President Obama’s senior staff were infiltrated.

The security breach caused temporary system outages "as a result of measures we have taken to defend our network," according to the official, as the unusual network activity was spotted and dealt with.

The publication says the hackers' intention did not appear to be based on stealing information or destroying systems, but rather probing and potentially mapping the unclassified White House network, or to simply conduct some kind of surveillance.

The Washington Post reports that Russian hackers may be to blame, as the country is believed to be at fault for a breach of the US military's classified networks in 2008.

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The White House official said:

Certainly a variety of actors find our networks to be attractive targets and seek access to sensitive information. We are still assessing the activity of concern.

The FBI, Secret Service and National Security Agency are investigating the security breach.

Read on: In the world of security

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