Having all your music for practically nothing

Summary:I've become an evangelical convert to Listen.com's Rhapsody service, an online "jukebox" with more than 20,000 tracks of recorded music.

I've become an evangelical convert to Listen.com's Rhapsody service, an online "jukebox" with more than 20,000 tracks of recorded music. For the modest sum of $24.95 per quarter, I can log in from any computer and listen to whatever I choose--and if I'm too lazy to choose, Rhapsody supplies a wide variety of themed "stations" plus a customizable playlist facility. Music is streamed (which can result in delays) but cached locally so that replays go off without a hitch. As soon as I subscribed I hooked my home PC up to our stereo. I haven't slotted a CD since.

So what?

I'm a poster child for one of the record industry's worst problems: I haven't bought a CD in years. When I went from DINK (Double Income, No Kids) to SITCOM (Single Income, Two Children, Onerous Mortgage), CDs--particularly those annoying "one-hit wonder" discs--became an unjustifiable luxury. But Rhapsody has me cheerfully spending $100 per year on music, and some significant chunk of that presumably winds up in the music labels' pockets. Certain misguided people I've accosted object that they want to "own" their music (local copy), not "rent" it (server copy), but that

Topics: Legal

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