Having forced one Irish ISP to adopt three strikes rules, labels sue to force others to match policy

The RIAA recording industry is determined to rip Internet access away from illegal downloaders and it continued its campaign with legal action in Ireland. Check this one out, it's really jaw-dropping.

The RIAA recording industry is determined to rip Internet access away from illegal downloaders and it continued its campaign with legal action in Ireland. Check this one out, it's really jaw-dropping. The Irish Times reports reports that the Big Four are suing telco BT Ireland and cable company UPC Ireland to force them to adopt a "three strikes" policy against downloaders. The reason: As part of a settlement against Eircom, in which the ISP agreed to kick off persistent downloaders, the RIAA promised to get BT and UPC to do the same. They didn't exactly agree with smiles and a handshake, so now the RIAA is suing them. To force companies with whom they have no settlement agreement to declare the same war on customers that is working such wonders for the recording industry.

UPC held firm: A spokeswoman said UPC “has made its position clear from the outset – it will not agree to a request that goes beyond what is currently provided under existing legislation”. She added:

There is no basis under Irish law requiring ISPs to control, access or block the internet content its users download. In addition, the rights-holders’ proposal gives rise to serious concerns for data privacy and consumer contract law.
BT declined comment. Even though the European Parliament rejected a three-strikes package because it viewed Internet access as a "fundamental right," and a French court threw out a similar three-strikes law, and Digital Britain declined to recommend cutting off downloaders, the industry continues its campaign to bring the Internet under its control through whatever outrageous schemes its lobbyists can convince technophobic officials to embrace.

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