He walked up to my friend in a music store and pitched VoIP

Last night, a friend went into a music store to look at an upright bass. A bluegrass fan, she's studying to become a practitioner.

Last night, a friend went into a music store to look at an upright bass. A bluegrass fan, she's studying to become a practitioner.

While there, she was approached by a salesperson for VoIP services. Last night, she emailed meabout the conversation.

After the fellow saw my friend pull out her cell phone to make a call, "he segued into VoIP and said if I wanted to subscribe to that kind of service, he was selling it," my friend wrote.Then he went out to his car, and got one of his business cards.

Turns out he works for MyAdCalls, a company that recruits "Advisors" to tout the company's proprietary AdCalls dialer softphone.

Advisors pay $295 to sign up, plus $49 a month for something called the "Business Builder Responder." They make their money back through selling referrals and advertising.

These Advisors are recruited based on being able to give "away FREE (caps are theirs, not mine) long distance calling to everyone you know."

I haven't tried the phone yet. I will, and will let you know what I think.

As far as the Advisors deal, though, this does sound likemulti-level marketing to me. Absent any negative information, I cannot comment on whetherbeing an AdCalls salesperson is a good deal or not.

Ican report though, that my friend reported "no pressure" from this Advisor, who apparentlyhas undertaken this gig to subsidize his income as a jazz musician.

Taking a "day job" to subsidize one's art? I understand.

How does this whole Advisor proposition strike you? Would you sign up for VoIP from such a person? Post a TalkBack.


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