HP adds construction to the menu of data-center services

For HP, the construction business is an opportunity to grab a larger share of the buyer's wallet and tighten its relationship with the customer.

Hewlett-Packard is anticipating a surge in data center construction and it wants to capture more of the money customers will spend to build them.

The company, today, announced Critical Facilities Implementation service (CFI), a construction management practice, to design, supply the innards and build the data center shell.  CFI is already operating in China and India, where HP expects much of the expansion to occur.

Previously, HP's Critical Facilities Services (CFS) would perform the engineering on the space, but the customer would contract with a construction manager to build the facility, something known as "design-bid-build," Rick Einhorn, worldwide director of CFS told Data Center Knowledge. CFI will handle the construction management component, but HP doesn't intend to put hammer and nail in the hands of its employees. It will work with local contractors to complete the work, he said.

For customers, HP is selling the advantages it says come from using a single vendor -- a single throat-to-choke when something goes wrong and a cheaper price tag. The program could drive down end-to-end costs as much as 25 to 30 percent, Einhorn told ComputerWorld. Most of that savings is achieved by reducing the schedule. "You can compress a lot of the work that's done in design and construction ... start construction sooner rather than later, and get your facility to market sooner."

For HP, the construction business is an opportunity to grab a larger share of the buyer's wallet and tighten its relationship with the customer.

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