ICANN has decided to ban the use of dotless domains

Summary:In plainer terms, this means Internet users won't be seeing Web addresses that look like, "http://insert name here."

search-web-magnifying

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has decided to ban the use of dotless domain names.

In a resolution issued earlier this week, the non-profit organization defined dotless domains to mean "consist of a single label and require the inclusion of, for example, an A, AAAA, or MX, record in the apex of a TLD zone in the DNS."

In plainer terms, this means Internet users won't be seeing Web addresses that look like, "http://insert name here." The basic URL protocol and format remains the same.

ICANN has been revisiting Web address formats for some time now.

For instance in 2011 , the group declared that companies would be able to register almost any word as a generic top-level domain (gTLD).

But things have been murkier lately.

In May , ICANN admitted that it wasn't sure if gTLDs would make the internet easier to use or just more confusing.

Perhaps the moral of the story here will end up being the tried-and-true, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" mantra.

Topics: Tech Industry, Google, Web development

About

Rachel King is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in San Francisco, covering business and enterprise technology for ZDNet, CNET and SmartPlanet. She has previously worked for The Business Insider, FastCompany.com, CNN's San Francisco bureau and the U.S. Department of State. Rachel has also written for MainStreet.com, Irish Americ... Full Bio

zdnet_core.socialButton.googleLabel Contact Disclosure

Kick off your day with ZDNet's daily email newsletter. It's the freshest tech news and opinion, served hot. Get it.

Related Stories

The best of ZDNet, delivered

You have been successfully signed up. To sign up for more newsletters or to manage your account, visit the Newsletter Subscription Center.
Subscription failed.