Intel investing billions in U.S. manufacturing, creating thousands of jobs

Intel said today that it is investing between $6 billion and $8 billion on next-generation manufacturing technology in its U.S facilities, a move that not only supports up to 1,000 new high-tech jobs but will also create 6,000-8,000 construction jobs for a new development fabrication plant in Oregon that will support deployment of 22-nanometer technology.

Intel said today that it is investing between $6 billion and $8 billion on next-generation manufacturing technology in its U.S facilities, a move that not only supports up to 1,000 new high-tech jobs but will also create 6,000-8,000 construction jobs for a new development fabrication plant in Oregon that will support deployment of 22-nanometer technology.

In a statement, Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini said:

Today’s announcement reflects the next tranche of the continued advancement of Moore’s Law and a further commitment to invest in the future of Intel and America. The most immediate impact of our multi-billion-dollar investment will be the thousands of jobs associated with building a new fab and upgrading four others, and the high-wage, high-tech manufacturing jobs that follow.

The company has its sights set on the future with this announcement. The upgraded facilities are intended to support the continued growth of the PC market, as well as other computing markets, such as mobile and embedded computing.

The new Oregon facility is scheduled for R&D startup in 2013 and the company is planning upgrades at four existing factories in Arizona and Oregon.

The company said the investments will "create capacity for innovation we haven't yet imagined" and that this is an example of how the U.S. can continue to support a manufacturing economy on the home front while still investing in future technologies. The company said that about three-fourths of its revenues are generated overseas but that three-fourths of its microprocessor manufacturing happens in the U.S.

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