Intel sits atop EPA's Green Power ranking for Fortune 500 companies

Sorry, off to bit of a slow start this week, but I promise the pace will pick up tomorrow with the myriad briefings I've had from the likes of everyone from AMD and Intel (actually, missed that one because of a bum number but they have pretty significant news) to Dell and IBM to power utility software developer Faronics. You'll have your heads full digesting everything they (and I) have got to say.

Sorry, off to bit of a slow start this week, but I promise the pace will pick up tomorrow with the myriad briefings I've had from the likes of everyone from AMD and Intel (actually, missed that one because of a bum number but they have pretty significant news) to Dell and IBM to power utility software developer Faronics. You'll have your heads full digesting everything they (and I) have got to say. I've got a bunch of research to share this week, too.

But first up, the Environmental Protection Agency earlier this month updated its ongoing Green Power Partnership lists of the top companies, federal and local government agencies, and education institutions that are integrating alternative energy options into their utility mix.

I didn't notice these lists were out until a certain No. 3 company on the Fortune 500 ranking reminded me. You'll have to look at the list here to find out who I'm talking about (hint, four-letter name, headquartered in Texas). Meanwhile, I will tell you that the top Fortune 500 company was Intel, which consumes about 1.3 billion kilowatt-hours of green power on an annual basis, which is roughly 47 percent of its total energy consumption.

Intel actually is also the top-ranked company on the National 50 list.

The No. 8 company on the Fortune 500 list was Cisco Systems with annual consumption of 385.6 million kilowatt-hours, or about 44 percent of its annual energy usage. (Cisco is No. 9 on the National 50; it got edged out one spot by the U.S. Air Force.) And, yes, you guessed it, Dell is also on the National 50, ranked at No. 4. Dell is credited with 553.7 million kilowatt-hours of annual green power consumption.

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