Iranian protesters take to the tweets

With Iranian authorities essentially locking foreign journalists in their hotels, shutting down websites and blocking text messaging, Iranian protesters have taken to Twitter, YouTube and Facebook with a passion -- both to get the word out about what's happening in the country and to communicate logistics, says a CBS/AP report.

With Iranian authorities essentially locking foreign journalists in their hotels, shutting down websites and blocking text messaging, Iranian protesters have taken to Twitter, YouTube and Facebook with a passion -- both to get the word out about what's happening in the country and to communicate logistics, says a CBS/AP report.

CBS News science and technology correspondent Daniel Sieberg combed Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and photo-sharing site Flickr, and found that those opposing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad refusing to be silenced.

"Against all odds," says Sieberg, "they're taking their voices to the Internet and seem to be announcing, 'The revolution will be blogged." '

Of course, Iran is blocking the social networking websites. But, just like the cliche says, the net is routing around that damage.

Twitter and other social-networking sites remained blocked Monday in Iran. Users must go to other sites that post tweets for them and allow them to read tweets from others.

Checking Twitter as I write this, I see lots of posts getting the word out about events in the country:

Tonight 10:30-12, "Alaho Akbar" from rooftops. #IranElection

URGNT@ ALL jornlsts, Tday 15:30 Prss Conf. in Tehran, Sadr MotrWay, Kave Shomali Blvd, Roshanayi St, Bahar Shomali St. Num. 9 #IranElectio

All Mousavi's news from GhalamNews is now on google: http://sites.google.com/sit... they cant block google #IranElection

@twitter Twitter is currently our ONLY way to communicate overnight news in Iran, PLEASE do not take it down. #IranElection

We have no national press coverage in Iran, everyone should help spread Mousavi's message. One Person = One Broadcaster. #IranElection

What a fantastic, inspiring reminder that the point of all our technology is to communicate important issues outside of corporate or governmental controls. This becomes clear in a crisis but here in the West, our flow of information is also restricted by the media's belief in what "sells" and reporters' cozy relationships with the powers that be.

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