Is this the most offensive iPhone app of the year?

Summary:Gratuitous rant: Someone at Apple clearly missed their morning coffee, because they let through the 'most offensive app' of the year: a 'cure' for gay people.

"Of the year"; I know it's only March, but I have one hell of a bee in my bonnet on this one.

Exodus International, a Christian ministry organisation, wrote and published an application on the Apple App Store, which 'teaches' gay people and "those struggling with unwanted same-sex attraction to live a life congruent with biblical teaching".

It's an anti-gay application, essentially, teaching those who are gay how not to be gay.

Not only is it entirely repugnant, disrespectful and just plain wrong to attempt to 'teach' people not to be gay, it is equally disgusting that it was published to the mobile market through application store mechanisms.

However, I don't blame Apple per se for this all but inevitable cock up. With over 300,000 applications on the App Store, it is nearly impossible to guarantee that all are going to be well behaved and not cause offence. Someone at Apple clearly missed their coffee that morning.

Apple did delete the application from the App Store citing reasons that it was "offensive to large groups of people", but whether or not the 150,000 people petititoning against the application had any effect it is unclear.

Besides, Apple isn't homophobic. Why else would they sport the rainbow flag on one of their corporate logos?

Let's just get something straight. I shouldn't even have to say this, but I'm truly glad that the very vast majority of our respective societies agree. There is nothing, even remotely wrong with being gay. Not even a teensy bit.

Don't get me wrong. I'm all for freedom of speech. It's partly one of the reasons why I'm a journalist. But anyone who disagrees with the above statement, you need to have a word with yourself.

But the figures show only 16,000 downloads with 'only 500 negative ratings'. I would be happy to bet money on two significant contributing factors to this: the vast majority of people were shocked and equally curious enough to actually see what kind of foul content was in this application, and only a small minority could be arsed to actually leave a negative rating before deleting the application.

Figures mean nothing, unless you can prove what people mean by them. I can only hypothesise, but it's my true hope that the human condition follows suit with my theory, otherwise we're all pretty much bloody doomed.

</rant>

Topics: Mobility

About

Zack Whittaker writes for ZDNet, CNET, and CBS News. He is based in New York City.

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